E.g., 08/05/2021
E.g., 08/05/2021
Jacob Hofstetter
Experts & Staff
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Jacob Hofstetter

Associate Policy Analyst

202 266 1912

Jacob Hofstetter is an Associate Policy Analyst at the Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy, where he conducts research and policy analysis to promote the long-term civic, economic, and linguistic integration of immigrants and refugees, with a focus on adult education and workforce development policy.

Previously, he worked as a Research and Policy Associate at the Massachusetts Appleseed Center for Law and Justice, where he led a project evaluating language access in the child welfare system of Massachusetts. He has also interned for Refugee Services of Texas, worked as a Legal Services Coordinator for Human Rights First in Houston, and spent a year as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant in Spain.

Mr. Hofstetter holds a master’s degree in global policy studies with a focus on immigration and refugee policy from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, Austin and a BA in history from Miami University.

Bio Page Tabs

Video, Audio
April 21, 2021

MPI analysts discuss their analysis comparing key sociodemographic characteristics of immigrant and U.S.-born parents of young and school-age children, along with the two-generational implications of these findings.

Recent Activity

Video, Audio, Webinars
April 21, 2021

MPI analysts discuss their analysis comparing key sociodemographic characteristics of immigrant and U.S.-born parents of young and school-age children, along with the two-generational implications of these findings. Speakers also explored potential ways to incorporate measures with an eye to achieving more responsive and effective service designs and improving equity and access more generally for these families.

Fact Sheets
April 2021

Parents play an important role in supporting their children’s education, but certain factors—such as limited English proficiency, low levels of formal education, and digital access barriers—can make it difficult to do so. This fact sheet series looks at the characteristics of immigrant and U.S.-born parents of young and elementary-school-age children in 31 states and nationwide, and discusses how taking a two-generation approach to services can benefit entire families.