E.g., 04/19/2021
E.g., 04/19/2021
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Post date: Mon, 19 Apr 2021 10:41:57 -0400

Technically, people forced to move because of climate disasters are not considered “refugees.” But the UN High Commissioner for Refugees still takes climate issues into account, and since 2020 Andrew Harper has been its special advisor on climate action. We talked with Harper about his agency’s role in responding to climate issues, which regions are most likely to be affected by climate impacts, and why climate is a “vulnerability multiplier” for refugees.

Post date: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 15:37:55 -0400

This report release event examines migration management in Mexico and Central America, and the growing government attention to migration functions, enhanced immigration enforcement, increased investments in asylum systems and existing protection frameworks, as well as labor migration policies. This is the original audio. Speakers made their remarks in Spanish and English. There is no interpretation on this version. Spanish and English interpretations will be posted soon. 

Post date: Fri, 16 Apr 2021 09:08:40 -0400

WASHINGTON and STUTTGART — Seeking to redesign the global humanitarian protection and refugee resettlement infrastructure in ways that advance equity, flexibility and sustainability, the Migration Policy Institute and Robert Bosch Stiftung today launched a new initiative, “Beyond Territorial Asylum: Making Protection Work in a Bordered World.”

Post date: Thu, 15 Apr 2021 12:21:34 -0400

Immigrants from the Dominican Republic are the fourth-largest Hispanic immigrant group in the United States, and number nearly 1.2 million people. This population has increased almost tenfold since 1960, but remains mostly concenreated in just a few metro areas. This article provides an overview of Dominican immigrants in the United States.

Post date: Wed, 14 Apr 2021 14:38:46 -0400

WASHINGTON — La región que se extiende desde Panamá hasta la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México forma parte de un importante corredor para la migración irregular. Si bien se ha prestado mucha atención a los esfuerzos de Estados Unidos para gestionar los flujos espontáneos de migrantes irregulares y solicitantes de asilo, se ha prestado mucha menos atención a los esfuerzos incipientes en Centroamérica y México para desarrollar la capacidad de gestión migratoria y protección humanitaria en los últimos años.

Post date: Wed, 14 Apr 2021 14:28:25 -0400

WASHINGTON — The region from Panama northward to the U.S.-Mexico border represents a major corridor for unauthorized immigration. While significant attention has trained on U.S. efforts to manage spontaneous flows of irregular migrants and asylum seekers, far less focus has been given to nascent efforts in Central America and Mexico to build migration management and humanitarian protection capacity in recent years.

Post date: Tue, 13 Apr 2021 14:20:55 -0400

Los países de la región que se extiende desde Panamá hasta la frontera entre Estados Unidos y México enfrentan una importante oportunidad para fortalecer la cooperación en materia de migración. Este informe examina los pilares fundamentales que pueden sentar las bases de la cooperación regional. Además de evaluar la capacidad institucional, los marcos legales y las políticas migratorias, también identifica áreas clave en el desarrollo de capacidades.

Post date: Tue, 13 Apr 2021 13:14:27 -0400

The countries in the region that stretches from Panama to the U.S.-Mexico border face an important opportunity to strengthen cooperation on migration. This report examines key building blocks that can lay the foundation for regional cooperation. In addition to assessing institutional capacity, legal frameworks, and migration policies, it also identifies key areas for capacity-building efforts.

Post date: Sun, 11 Apr 2021 12:39:34 -0400

Marking the release of an International Organization for Migration (IOM)-Migration Policy Institute (MPI) report, this two-panel discussion, features introductory remarks by IOM Director General António Vitorino and examines how the pandemic has reshaped border management and human mobility in 2020 and what the lasting impacts may be throughout 2021 and beyond.

Post date: Thu, 08 Apr 2021 13:10:40 -0400

The European Union’s landmark 2016 migration deal with Turkey offered aid and other benefits in exchange for Turkey's assistance in helping reduce arrivals of asylum seekers and other migrants. At its fifth anniversary, the EU-Turkey deal remains one criticized by human-rights advocates and has met frustration from Turkey, but in many ways created a blueprint for other externalization arrangements, as this article outlines.

Post date: Tue, 06 Apr 2021 15:14:02 -0400

GENEVA and WASHINGTON — While the overall picture of cross-border human mobility in 2020 is of movement dramatically curtailed as a result of measures imposed by governments since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new report shows a varying reality over time and by region, with particularly harsh effects for refugees and other migrants who move out of necessity.

Post date: Tue, 06 Apr 2021 14:42:40 -0400

The COVID-19 pandemic dramatically curtailed cross-border mobility in 2020, affecting travelers and migrants around the world. This report presents a first-of-its-kind analysis of the many thousands of travel restrictions and border closures imposed by governments to curb the spread of the virus. It examines how these policies evolved, varied across countries and regions, and what these trends may mean for the future of international movement.

Post date: Fri, 02 Apr 2021 17:06:22 -0400

Popular discussions usually frame climate change-induced migration negatively, often as a strategy of last resort. But migrating abroad can also be an effective way to build resilience against the impacts of climate change. This episode discusses how migration can bring social, economic, and other benefits to migrants and their communities, in conversation with University of Vienna human geographer Harald Sterly.

Post date: Thu, 01 Apr 2021 11:16:48 -0400

The number of unaccompanied child migrants at the U.S. southern border has risen, presenting President Joe Biden with challenges similar to those faced by his predecessors in 2014 and 2019. This article examines the previous episodes and evaluates how Biden is mirroring or deviating from previous presidents' responses.

Post date: Tue, 30 Mar 2021 10:33:21 -0400

The increase in unaccompanied child arrivals at the U.S.-Mexico border in February and March has led to backups and overcrowding at U.S. Customs and Border Protection facilities ill-suited to house children, in part due to earlier significant reductions in Office of Refugee Resettlement shelter capacity during 2020. This commentary explores preparedness shortfalls and the options the Biden administration has moving forward.

Post date: Mon, 29 Mar 2021 10:24:12 -0400

WASHINGTON — Ensuring that school funding is shared equitably is central to achieving strong K-12 educational systems across the United States. However states have yet to implement school funding formulas that generate adequate and equitable resources for all students. For English Learners (EL), who have supplemental learning needs and are disproportionately likely to attend low-resourced schools, well-designed resource allocation is of particular importance.