E.g., 09/17/2019
E.g., 09/17/2019

Migration Policy Institute - No name

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Post date: Wed, 11 Sep 2019 12:42:46 -0400

As Greece's Aegean islands continue to grapple with migrants arriving on their shores, decisions regarding the needs of newcomers are negotiated in Brussels and Athens, far removed from the situation on the ground. Meanwhile, local communities have had successes in hosting migrants, as this article drawing on observations from the hospitality center and refugee camp on Lesvos explores.

Post date: Mon, 09 Sep 2019 18:55:34 -0400

BRUSSELS — Migration Policy Institute Europe’s administrative council has selected Dr. Hanne Beirens as the respected think tank’s new director, tapping a leader with a proven track record in the research, public policy and project management realms.

Beirens, who has served as MPI Europe’s acting director in recent months and has been with the organisation as associate director since 2015, was selected from a pool of highly qualified candidates who emerged during an intensive and open search process.

Post date: Wed, 04 Sep 2019 15:12:38 -0400

New Zealand drew global attention for its unity and support for the Muslim community targeted during the horrific Christchurch attacks. Yet the country's road to inclusion has been far from straightforward, and amid rising diversity it is grappling with the best way to achieve inclusion for its multiethnic population, including indigenous Māori peoples and migrants. This article outlines the opportunities and challenges to fostering multiculturalism against a backdrop of bicultural policies.

Post date: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:01:27 -0400

Marking a policy brief's release, this webinar explores the promise of home visiting services that support new parents alongside their infants and toddlers, plus strategies for improving how these programs work with immigrant and linguistically diverse families.

Post date: Wed, 28 Aug 2019 12:58:44 -0400

Approximately 450,000 Brazilian immigrants resided in the United States in 2017, an increase of nearly one-third since 2010. Representing 1 percent of the nation's 44.5 million immigrants, Brazilians tend to have higher educational attainment and household incomes compared to the overall foreign-born population. Get the latest data on Brazilians immigrants, including flows over time, geographic distribution, and more in this Spotlight.

Post date: Fri, 23 Aug 2019 18:17:05 -0400

WASHINGTON – Home visiting programs, which serve expecting and new parents alongside their infants and toddlers, have proven to be an effective model to support maternal health and well-being as well as children’s health and socioemotional development, particularly for at-risk families.

Post date: Thu, 22 Aug 2019 10:48:18 -0400

Home visiting programs for young families are growing in popularity across the United States, and have demonstrated their effectiveness in supporting maternal health and child well-being. At the same time, more infants and toddlers are growing up in immigrant families and households where a language other than English is spoken. Why then are these children under-represented in these programs? This brief explores common barriers, ways to address them, and why it is important to do so.

Post date: Wed, 21 Aug 2019 11:46:22 -0400

Authoritarian states have long attempted to restrict citizens’ movement. But what happens when their reach extends beyond their borders? The October 2018 assassination of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi brought into sharp relief the long arm of these regimes in reaching citizens abroad. This phenomenon, “transnational authoritarianism,” further shows that the relationship between migration and authoritarianism is becoming more complex.

Post date: Tue, 20 Aug 2019 19:01:34 -0400

Marking the launch of New York Times reporter Jason DeParle's book tracing the arc of migration and its impacts through the life of an extended family of Filipino migrants over a three-decade period, from Manila and through Dubai to the Houston area, this conversation with MPI's Andrew Selee and the World Bank's Dilip Ratha explores migration at both a global and very personal level.

Post date: Thu, 15 Aug 2019 16:07:09 -0400

WASHINGTON — Clouds hover over what has been a strong U.S. economy, with long-run projections significantly less bright because the U.S. labor market is being reshaped by forces such as aging of the workforce, the lowest rate of population growth since the 1940s and emerging gaps between the skills employers seek and those workers possess. As these trends intensify, globalization and automation also are likely to dramatically transform how and where work is done.

Post date: Thu, 15 Aug 2019 11:42:07 -0400

This discussion marked the launch of MPI's Rethinking U.S. Immigration Policy Initiative, which aims to generate a big-picture, evidence-driven vision of the role immigration should play in America’s future, as well as to build a bipartisan center so needed reforms can be enacted. The initiative's leader, MPI Senior Fellow Doris Meissner, joins in conversation with former Bush administration Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez and former Obama White House Domestic Policy Council Director Cecilia Muñoz about the prospects for action and what's needed.

Post date: Wed, 14 Aug 2019 15:14:43 -0400

WASHINGTON – Major changes in demographics, automation and alternative staffing will dramatically transform the U.S. labor market over the next few decades. A shrinking native-born workforce, baby boomer retirements, tech-driven innovation but also job displacement, and increases in contracted and outsourced labor, among other trends, will have significant effects on the U.S. economy. What role can immigration play in mitigating undesirable outcomes and supporting U.S. economic growth and competitiveness?

Post date: Tue, 13 Aug 2019 14:43:47 -0400

This MPI webinar marks the release of a policy brief that explores program and policy opportunities to improve home visiting services for immigrant and DLL families currently underparticipating in these programs due to a lack of culturally and linguistically responsive programming and other barriers

Post date: Mon, 12 Aug 2019 12:58:39 -0400

Si bien se ha prestado mucha atención a los centroamericanos recién llegados a la frontera entre los Estados Unidos y México, casi la mitad de los aproximadamente 3.5 millones que vivían en los Estados Unidos en 2017 llegaron antes de 2000. Aproximadamente un tercio son ciudadanos estadounidenses y tienden a participar en la fuerza laboral con más frecuencia que otros extranjeros y estadounidenses. Descubra más en este artículo lleno de datos.

Post date: Mon, 12 Aug 2019 11:16:49 -0400

While much attention has been paid to recent Central American arrivals at the U.S.-Mexico border, nearly half of the approximately 3.5 million Central Americans resident in the United States in 2017 arrived before 2000. About one-third are naturalized U.S. citizens, and they tend to participate in the labor force at a higher rate than foreign- and U.S.-born adults. Discover more about this population in this data-rich article.

Post date: Thu, 08 Aug 2019 12:35:20 -0400

The U.S. economy is facing an uncertain future as an aging workforce, stagnating labor force participation, skill mismatches, and automation reshape the labor market. This issue brief explores these forces and the role that immigration could play in supporting future U.S. economic growth. It also examines how immigration affects workers already in the country, both native born and immigrant.

Post date: Thu, 08 Aug 2019 12:19:43 -0400

In the coming decades, the U.S. labor market will undergo major transformation. Automation, an aging workforce, and alternative staffing practices will change how, where, and by whom work is done. This think piece, by a former chief economist for the U.S. Labor Department, explores how immigrant workers fit into this changing landscape, and what immigration and workforce policy changes could help maximize their contributions to the U.S. economy.

Post date: Thu, 08 Aug 2019 12:09:29 -0400

The public-charge rule issued by the Trump administration in August 2019 will have profound effects on future immigration and on use of public benefits by millions of legal noncitizens and their U.S.-citizen family members. Complex standards for determining when an immigrant is likely to become a public charge could cause a significant share of the nearly 23 million noncitizens and U.S. citizens in benefits-using immigrant families to disenroll, as this commentary explains.

Post date: Thu, 08 Aug 2019 11:53:08 -0400

The U.S. immigration system is in desperate need of an overhaul. What has been missing is an alternate vision for a path forward that treats immigration as a strategic resource while also accounting for heightened security and rule-of-law imperatives, which together can further U.S. interests, values, and democratic principles as a society. This concept note outlines a new MPI initiative, Rethinking U.S. Immigration Policy, that seeks to fill this gap.

Post date: Tue, 06 Aug 2019 18:44:31 -0400

This event marked the launch of New York Times reporter Jason DeParle's book tracing the arc of migration as a phenomenon, witnessed through three decades observing a particular Filipino family moving from Manila to Texas. The conversation explored both the human and policy aspects of migration and development.