E.g., 01/19/2018
E.g., 01/19/2018

Caitlin Katsiaficas

Experts & Staff

Caitlin Katsiaficas

Research Assistant

Caitlin Katsiaficas is a Research Assistant at the Migration Policy Institute, where she works with the National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy. Her research focuses on policies and practices that support the successful integration of immigrant and refugee families.

Prior to joining MPI, she conducted research on European Union migration policy, including irregular migration, international protection, and border management for Bridging Europe, and worked at George Washington University’s Institute for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies. She also interned at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement, where she wrote a strategy paper on strengthening cooperation with other government agencies to assist resettled refugees and service providers, and provided case management support to refugees and asylum seekers in the Refugee Services Program in Portland, Maine.

Ms. Katsiaficas holds an MA and BA (summa cum laude) in international affairs from George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, where she focused on conflict, migration, and development. She also studied in Belgium and Turkey.

Bio Page Tabs

Fact Sheets
October 2017
By Maki Park, Anna O’Toole, and Caitlin Katsiaficas
Fact Sheets
December 2016
By Maki Park, Margie McHugh, and Caitlin Katsiaficas

Smugglers and migrants adapted their paths in light of changing conditions in 2016, including the construction of walls and closure of borders. Cuban and Haitian migrants increasingly chose to make their way to the United States through South and Central America rather than by sea. Meanwhile, migrant flows to Europe have splintered into a wider range of routes, seeking new openings through the Western Balkans.

Movements of migrants and asylum seekers in the Mediterranean have shown to be highly fluid, adapting quickly to changing conditions at origin, transit, and destination. This article examines the shifts in flows across the three major Mediterranean routes since 2008 and the complex web of often interconnected factors underpinning these movements.

Recent Activity

Fact Sheets
October 2017

As the share of U.S. children under age 8 who are Dual Language Learners (DLLs) increases, state policies have an important role to play in ensuring all young learners are able to get their education off to a good start. These fact sheets compare key characteristics of DLLs and their peers nationwide and in 30 states, and identify state policies that support equitable access to high-quality early childhood education and care programs.

Fact Sheets
December 2016

These fact sheets provide a sociodemographic sketch of parents with children ages 0 to 8 in the 30 states with the largest number of immigrant families, offering data and analysis of some of the key parental characteristics to help stakeholders identify populations that could be targets for early childhood and parent-focused programs working to improve child and parent outcomes.

Online Journal

Smugglers and migrants adapted their paths in light of changing conditions in 2016, including the construction of walls and closure of borders. Cuban and Haitian migrants increasingly chose to make their way to the United States through South and Central America rather than by sea. Meanwhile, migrant flows to Europe have splintered into a wider range of routes, seeking new openings through the Western Balkans.

Reports
November 2016

Two-generation programs that weave together early childhood learning with adult-focused programs hold great potential to break cycles of intergenerational poverty for low-income parents with young children. Little research has been done on how these programs succeed with immigrant families. This report studies select programs and offers analysis of the sociodemographic characteristics of U.S. parents with young children.

Online Journal

Movements of migrants and asylum seekers in the Mediterranean have shown to be highly fluid, adapting quickly to changing conditions at origin, transit, and destination. This article examines the shifts in flows across the three major Mediterranean routes since 2008 and the complex web of often interconnected factors underpinning these movements.