E.g., 06/20/2019
E.g., 06/20/2019

Brian Salant

MPI Authors

Brian Salant

Brian Salant was a Research Assistant with the Migration Policy Institute’s International Program, where his research focused on skilled labor mobility in the ASEAN region, qualifications recognition, and public attitudes toward migration.

Prior to joining MPI, Mr. Salant interned at the Public Diplomacy Section of the U.S. Embassy in Ankara, Turkey, where he coordinated youth outreach programs, and later at the Meridian International Center in Washington, D.C. designing exchange programs to nurture social entrepreneurship among youth leaders from around the world.

Mr. Salant holds a master’s degree in European and Russian studies from Yale University, a master’s in EU studies from the University of Ghent, and a bachelor of arts from the University of California, Los Angeles.  

Bio Page Tabs

Policy Briefs
October 2018
By Kathleen Newland and Brian Salant
Policy Briefs
April 2018
By Kate Hooper and Brian Salant
Policy Briefs
January 2018
By Susan Fratzke and Brian Salant
Tracing the Channels Refugees Use to Seek Protection in Europe
Reports
September 2017
By Susan Fratzke and Brian Salant
Reports
March 2017
By Kate Hooper, Maria Vincenza Desiderio, and Brian Salant
Reports
February 2017
By Dovelyn Rannveig Mendoza, Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Maria Vincenza Desiderio, Brian Salant, Kate Hooper, and Taylor Elwood
Reports
January 2017
By Dovelyn Rannveig Mendoza, Maria Vincenza Desiderio, Guntur Sugiyarto, and Brian Salant

Pages

South Sudanese refugee girl

Millions of displaced people were unable to return home in 2017, and countless others found themselves newly displaced. Targeted violence in Myanmar caused more than 624,000 Rohingya to flee to Bangladesh, and conflict in South Sudan drove at least 668,000 abroad. Some first-asylum countries, such as Uganda and Turkey, were largely accommodating, while others, such as Jordan and Lebanon, pressured refugees to leave.

Governments on the receiving end of migrants and refugees reinforced their commitment to returns in 2017, sending or coercing migrants to move back to impoverished or violent homelands. The Dominican Republic pushed out some 70,000 Haitians and native born of Haitian descent, while more than 500,000 Afghans left Iran and Pakistan. Though many of these migrants chose to return, in practice the line between forced and voluntary returns is blurry.

In stark contrast to a Europe that is erecting new barriers and reinstituting border controls, other regions around the world are moving toward greater mobility for intraregional travelers and migrants. Regional blocs in South America and Southeast Asia have been working to ease intraregional movements of workers, and the African Union in 2016 launched a new biometric African passport.

Video, Audio
October 12, 2017

The refugee and migration crisis in Europe thrust the issue of legal pathways to the top of European Union (EU) and national government agendas, but progress has so far suffered from a lack of strategic thinking on how legal channels can work together and how to overcome design and implementation challenges. This webinar offers insights from EU Member States on how existing, new, and untapped legal pathways—such as resettlement, community-based sponsorship, and family reunification—can interact with other humanitarian policies and fit into a larger protection strategy. The discussion also highlights two MPI Europe publications, Tracing the Channels Refugees Use to Seek Protection in Europe and Engaging Communities in Refugee Protection: The Potential of Private Sponsorship in Europe.

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