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Unpacking the Links between Segregation, Community Cohesion, and Opportunity: A Transatlantic Discussion
Webinar
September 18, 2014

MPI Webinar

Unpacking the Links between Segregation, Community Cohesion, and Opportunity: A Transatlantic Discussion

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Video

Unpacking the Links between Segregation, Community Cohesion, and Opportunity: A Transatlantic Dis...

Speakers: 

John Iceland, Professor of Sociology and Demography and Head of Department of Sociology and Criminology, Penn State University 

Korrie Louwes, Former Vice Mayor of Rotterdam 

Patrick Simon, Director of Research at the Institute national d’études démographiques (INED) and fellow researcher at le centre d’études européennes, Sciences Po 

 

Moderator: 

Meghan Benton, MPI Policy Analyst

 

While immigration can have huge economic benefits for cities, cities are also more likely to feel the burdens of rapid population change. One of the main perceived negative effects is residential segregation, which can cut communities off from one another and fuel poverty and disadvantage. But ethnic enclaves can also provide a number of benefits, especially to new arrivals as they find their feet, and seemingly segregated neighborhoods are often more diverse than they seem. Under what conditions is segregation harmful, and what can policymakers do about it?
 
In this webinar, experts and policymakers from Europe and the United States discuss the relationship between immigration, residential segregation, community relations, and economic opportunities.
 
The webinar addresses questions such as: 
  • How do ethnic enclaves where immigrants first settle when they move to a city differ from other forms of residential segregation, such as black/white segregation in the United States? 
  • How does residential segregation affect socioeconomic opportunities and social cohesion? 
  • And what—if anything—can and should policymakers do to encourage mixed neighborhoods—or are other pieces of the puzzle (such as ensuring city services are responsive to the population they serve) more important?

This event concludes a Transatlantic Council on Migration series of papers on how cities in North America and Europe can make the most out of immigration. The series, “Cities and Regions: Reaping Migration’s Local Dividends” addressed questions from whether cities and regions should have more say over immigration policies, to how big a role immigration plays in the formation of tech clusters, to how local policymakers can stimulate migrant entrepreneurship.

Registration deadline for this event has passed.