E.g., 06/26/2022
E.g., 06/26/2022
Lillie Hinkle
Experts & Staff
Lillie Hinkle

Lillie Hinkle

Research Assistant

202-266-1908

Lillie Hinkle is a Research Assistant with MPI’s Human Services Initiative, where they work on issues including refugee resettlement, unaccompanied children's services, and access to benefits and services for immigrant families.

Prior to joining MPI, Mx. Hinkle worked with the International Rescue Committee in employment placement and family mentorship, providing services to newly arrived refugee families in Richmond, Virginia. They previously interned with MPI and a 3D printing lab specializing in archaeological curation.

Mx. Hinkle holds a master’s degree in refugee and forced migration studies from the University of Oxford, where they focused on the intersections of trauma and refugee service provision in the United States. During their graduate studies, they provided research assistance to the Rights in Exile Program, recruiting country-of-origin experts for an online legal aid resource network. They hold a bachelor's degree in anthropology and philosophy from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Bio Page Tabs

Cover image for Advancing Digital Equity among Immigrant-Origin Youth
Reports
February 2022
By  Essey Workie, Lillie Hinkle, Anna deDufour and Valerie Lacarte
Bhutanese refugee sits on bed in family's apartment in New York
Commentaries
June 2021
By  Essey Workie, Mark Greenberg and Lillie Hinkle

Recent Activity

Reports
February 2022

Since the pandemic began, technology has become an even more central part of Americans’ lives. Yet access to digital devices, the internet, and digital skills training has long been uneven. For many teenagers in immigrant families, including those who are English Learners, this digital divide has made remote learning challenging. This study identifies promising practices for increasing digital access and literacy among immigrant-origin youth.

Commentaries
June 2021

While asylees are eligible for many of the same public benefits and services as resettled refugees, including health care and employment assistance, there is no system to inform them of their eligibility and to help connect them to resources. MPI estimates that fewer than 20 percent of those granted asylum in recent years received Office of Refugee Resettlement benefits during their first year. The U.S. government could address this gap with a few simple measures.