E.g., 10/19/2020
E.g., 10/19/2020

Dany Bahar

MPI Authors

Dany Bahar

Dany Bahar is a Senior Fellow in the Global Economy and Development program at the Brookings Institution. He was previously a David M. Rubenstein Fellow at Brookings. An Israeli and Venezuelan economist, Dr. Bahar is also an Associate at the Harvard Center for International Development, and a Research Affiliate at both CESifo Group Munich and the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

His research is on the intersection between economic development and international economics. Lately, his research has focused on understanding the role migrants play in the diffusion of technology and knowledge within and across borders, as measured by productivity, structural transformation, exports, entrepreneurship, and innovation, among other factors. His work has been published by top academic journals and he regularly contributes with commentary to the press on topics related to migrants and refugees. He holds a PhD in public policy from Harvard University.

Bio Page Tabs

Venezuelan Migration, Crime, and Misperceptions: A Review of Data from Colombia, Peru, and Chile
Policy Briefs
September 2020
By Dany Bahar, Meagan Dooley, and Andrew Selee
Inmigrantes venezolanos, crimen y percepciones falsas: Un análisis de los datos en Colombia, Perú y Chile
Policy Briefs
September 2020
By Dany Bahar, Meagan Dooley, and Andrew Selee

Recent Activity

Policy Briefs
September 2020

Más de 4 millones de venezolanos han migrado a otros países de América Latina y el Caribe, lo que ha generado preocupación sobre cómo estas llegadas están afectando a las comunidades receptoras. Algunos políticos y expertos han afirmado que la migración está provocando un incremento en la delincuencia, un argumento que este informe examina a través de un análisis detallado de los datos de Chile, Colombia y Perú.

Policy Briefs
September 2020

More than 4 million Venezuelans have moved to other countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, raising concerns about how these arrivals are affecting receiving communities. Some politicians and pundits have asserted that migration is leading to an increase in crime—a claim this issue brief finds misplaced based on examination of official data from Chile, Colombia, and Peru.