E.g., 08/31/2014
E.g., 08/31/2014

Patterns and Predictors of School Readiness and Early Childhood Success among Young Children in Black Immigrant Families

Reports
October 2012

Patterns and Predictors of School Readiness and Early Childhood Success among Young Children in Black Immigrant Families

Using national data for a birth cohort of American children (the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort), this study aims to describe the early childhood experiences of second-generation African and Caribbean immigrants and to examine the link between these experiences and children's early academic skills during the transition to school. The authors identify the contextual factors — such as family circumstances, parenting practices, and enrollment in center-based child care — that encourage early school success, helping fill a significant gap in knowledge about the early childhood experiences of young children in Black immigrant families.

Good health practices on the part of Black immigrant mothers may explain the generally positive health outcomes observed among their children. In addition to investing in health, Black immigrant parents are also strongly oriented toward education for their children. One general implication of this work is that strategies to promote positive outcomes among children of Black immigrants should build on existing strengths.

Table of Contents 

I. Introduction

II. Background

A. School Readiness and Early School Success among Children of Immigrants

B. The Early Developmental Experiences and Outcomes of Black Children of Immigrants

III. Using National Longitudinal Data to Examine the Early Development of Children in Black Immigrant Families

IV. Data, Sample, and Measures

A. The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort

B. Analysis Sample

V. Results

A. Demographic Snapshot of Black Immigrant Families with Young U.S.-Born Children

B. The Health and Developmental Status of Young Children in Black Immigrant Families

C. Children's Early Learning Experiences at Home and in Child Care

D. What Factors Help Explain Early Academic Skill Differences between Children of Black Immigrants and Their Peers?

VI. Final Thoughts

A. Understanding Differences in School Readiness Skills between Children of Black Immigrants and Their Peers

B. Understanding Variation in School Readiness Skills among Children of Black Immigrants

C. Study Strengths and Limitations