E.g., 12/09/2019
E.g., 12/09/2019

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Data Tools

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Data Tools

Learn about participation in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program nationally and by state, as well as by top countries of origin. The two data tools offered here provide U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) data on active DACA recipients at U.S. and state levels as of June 30, 2019, as well as the Migration Policy Institute’s 2019 estimates of individuals who would have been eligible to participate based on the criteria outlined at the program’s launch in 2012. In September 2017, the Trump administration announced the termination of DACA, but courts have kept the program alive for people who currently have or have ever held DACA status. MPI offers its estimates to permit comparison of current DACA recipients against the number that ever could have applied under the program’s original rules.

The first tool offers the number of active DACA recipients and MPI estimates at U.S. and state levels. The second tool offers data for top countries of origin. Hover over a state or country to see the data.

* Estimates refer to the individuals who could have become eligible for DACA before it was terminated by the Trump administration in September 2017. While subsequent court injunctions have kept the program alive, they have done so only for individuals who have ever held DACA status.

For notes and sources, please see below second data tool.

 

* Estimates refer to the individuals who could have become eligible for DACA before it was terminated by the Trump administration in September 2017. While subsequent court injunctions have kept the program alive, they have done so only for individuals who have ever held DACA status.

Notes:
Migration Policy Institute (MPI) estimates of the DACA-eligible population as of 2019 include unauthorized immigrant youth who had been in the United States since 2007, were under the age of 16 at the time of arrival, and were under the age of 31 as of 2012. Three populations are estimated: (1) Immediately eligible youth and adults who met both age and educational criteria (i.e., they were ages 15 to 36 in 2019 and were either enrolled in school or had at least a high school diploma or equivalent); (2) youth and adults who were eligible but for education (i.e., those ages 15 to 36 in 2019 who met the other requirements but did not have a high school diploma or equivalent and were not enrolled in school); and (3) children eligible in the future who met the age-at-arrival requirements but were ages 9 to 14 in 2019, and will become eligible when they reach age 15 provided they stay in school. To capture the population eligible to apply in 2019 using 2016 data, MPI included youths aged 12-14 in 2016 (ages 15, 16, and 17 in 2019) in the estimates. Using the percent of the DACA-eligible population ages 19 to 24 without a GED or high school diploma and not enrolled in school in 2016, a portion of the immediately eligible 14-, 15-, and 16-year-olds in 2016 was excluded from the group to account for potential dropouts as this population ages. Eligibility due to adult-education program enrollment and ineligibility due to criminal history or lack of continuous U.S. presence were not modeled due to lack of data.

The 30 national-origin groups included in the tool are countries with at least 500 active DACA participants as of June 30, 2019.

Sources:
MPI analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data from the 2012-16 American Community Survey (ACS) pooled, and the 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), with legal status assignments by James Bachmeier and Colin Hammar of Temple University and Jennifer Van Hook of The Pennsylvania State University, Population Research Institute; U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), “Approximate Active DACA Recipients as of June 30, 2019, www.uscis.gov/sites/default/files/USCIS/Resources/Reports%20and%20Studies/Immigration%20Forms%20Data/Static_files/DACA_Population_Receipts_since_Injunction_Jun_30_2019.pdf.