E.g., 04/16/2024
E.g., 04/16/2024
Recession & Employment

Recession & Employment

_Recession+employment

Global economic crises hit migrants particularly hard, in some countries opening a wider gap in employment rates between foreign-born and native-born workers. The research offered here examines how immigrants fare in changing labor markets, the effects of economic crisis on immigrant employment and migration patterns, and policymaking as it relates to adjusting immigration levels and opening or narrowing labor markets for foreign-born workers.

Recent Activity

Articles
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Reports
March 2009
By  Madeleine Sumption and Will Somerville
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Reports
March 2009
By  Madeleine Sumption and Will Somerville
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Reports
January 2009
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Madeleine Sumption and Will Somerville
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Reports
January 2009
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Aaron Terrazas
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Reports
January 2009
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Annette Heuser

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Recent Activity

Books
May, 2009

This book reflects the effort of the Transatlantic Council on Migration to map how profound demographic change is likely to affect the size and character of global migration flows; and how governments can shape immigration policy in a world increasingly attuned to the hunt for talent.

Articles

Immigration flows to the United States have noticeably slowed in the last year, raising fundamental questions for policymakers and analysts about the effect the economic crisis is having on inflows and return migration. MPI's Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Aaron Terrazas assess the potential impacts by examining recent data, the likely behavior of immigrants, and immigration history.

Reports
March 2009

This paper intends to provide a baseline of evidence for policymakers seeking to calibrate their immigration policy responses to the economic downturn, with a focus on the UK.

Reports
March 2009

Public opinion supports the view that immigrants take natives’ jobs and reduce their wages, but most economists disagree. Although basic laws of supply and demand suggest that immigration could reduce wages by increasing the supply of workers, in reality the actual impact of immigration is likely to be small, especially in the long run.

Reports
January 2009

The global recession’s deepening effects on governments, public and private institutions, and individuals is increasingly taking center stage for migration policy stakeholders at both source and destination countries.

Reports
January 2009

This report seeks to understand and predict the potential impact of the economic crisis that began in December 2007 on legal and illegal immigration flows to and from the United States, and the likely effects of an economic downturn on the labor market performance of immigrants.

Reports
January 2009

This short briefing paper explores the potential effects of the economic crisis with respect to immigration across European Union Member States, and outlines how policymakers might respond to changing patterns of migrant inflows and outflows, and the consequences of the downturn on immigrants and their host communities.

 

Articles

In the 1990s, Mexican immigrants began to leave California, Texas, and Illinois for the so-called new settlement states where they had not previously resided. As Ivan Light of UCLA explains, their reasons for leaving or bypassing Los Angeles were both economic and political.

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