E.g., 04/17/2024
E.g., 04/17/2024
Postsecondary Education

Postsecondary Education

_PostSecondaryEd

Immigrant students represent a broad spectrum of talents, aspirations, and needs. While many succeed, they often face a number of risk factors associated with lower rates of college retention and degree completion. They are more likely to be “nontraditional” students, meaning that they often enroll at older ages, attend college part time, work while going to school, and juggle family responsibilities along with coursework. They are also more likely to require remediation before enrollment, due to language proficiency and academic preparation gaps that re-emerge at the college level.

Recent Activity

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Reports
June 2009
By  Maurice Crul and Jens Schneider
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Reports
April 2008
By  Michael Fix, Margie McHugh, Aaron Terrazas and Laureen Laglagaron
Articles
Articles

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Recent Activity

Reports
June 2009

The discussion guide offers a brief demographic and statistical profile of the immigrant student population in the United States, with comparison points drawn to Germany, sketches the broad policy implications of the demographic data, and provides a set of policy and practice issues in immigrant education and integration to facilitate a Roundtable inquiry in two areas: early childhood care and education, and secondary education.

Reports
April 2008

This report examines the large presence of unauthorized and mixed-status families, and the growing size of the second generation and its concerns within Los Angeles County and in California, drawing comparisons to broader national demographic trends and rationales for immigrant integration.

Articles

Dawn Konet provides an overview of the arguments for and against granting in-state tuition rates to the unauthorized in the United States, and looks at relevant legislation at the state and federal levels.

Articles

Nebraska's foreign-born population grew faster than that of any other Midwestern state between 1990 and 2000. Lourdes Gouveia and Mary Ann Powell of the University of Nebraska at Omaha shed light on the second generation's progress in the country's heartland.

Articles
As the U.S.-born children of Latino immigrants reach adulthood, new data suggest that they will fare better than their immigrant peers. Richard Fry, Senior Research Associate at the Pew Hispanic Center, explains why.

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