E.g., 06/10/2021
E.g., 06/10/2021
North America

North America

NorthAmerica_mapLARGE

North America is a dynamic migration region, with the United States home to more immigrants than any other country in the world, the Mexico-U.S. corridor the globe's top migration corridor, and Canada a leading destination for migrants. Research collected here focuses on everything from visa policy and border management to immigrant integration, national identity, the demographics of immigrants in the region and their educational and workforce outcomes, and ways to more effectively use migration policy as a lever for national and regional competitiveness.

Recent Activity

cover heritagetourism
Reports
September 2010
By  Kathleen Newland and Carylanna Taylor
spot aug10 300
Articles
Articles
cover englishinstruction
Fact Sheets
August 2010
By  Jeanne Batalova and Margie McHugh
cover statesELLs
Fact Sheets
August 2010
By  Jeanne Batalova and Margie McHugh

Pages

MPI's Maia Jachimowicz outlines the newly proposed immigration reform legislation: Safe, Orderly, Legal Visas and Enforcement Act of 2004 (SOLVE).
MPI Associate Policy Analyst Erin Patrick provides the latest figures on the U.S. refugee resettlement program, which is still operating well below traditional levels long after being thrown into crisis by the Sept. 11 attacks.
DHS Releases New Rules for Immigration Detainees... Changes Proposed for Visa-Waiver Countries... Supreme Court Hears Cases on Citizen and Non-Citizen Terrorism Suspects... Government Commission Calls Post-Sept. 11 Immigration Policies Ineffective...

MPI's Sarah Margon outlines the latest developments affecting U.S. migration policy, including the application of the US-VISIT program to nationals of visa-waiver countries.

Wayne Cornelius of the University of California at San Diego assesses the U.S. strategy for the border with Mexico.

Pages

Recent Activity

Policy Briefs
September 2010

Repealing birthright citizenship for U.S.-born children of unauthorized immigrants, a step discussed in some circles as a means to reduce illegal immigration, would significantly increase the size of the unauthorized immigrant population in the United States, from 11 million today to 16 million by 2050, this brief reveals.

Articles

The nation's 1.0 million Korean immigrants have settled in greater numbers in new destination states like Georgia, Washington, and Virginia. They are also more likely than immigrants overall to have a college degree and be naturalized citizens. MPI's Aaron Terrazas and Cristina Batog look at the population's size, geographic distribution and socioeconomic characteristics.

Articles

MPI's Muzaffar Chishti and Claire Bergeron break down the injunction against Arizona's immigration law and report on the debate over birthright citizenship, the passage of a $600 million border security bill, and more.

Reports
August 2010

Nearly 1 million U.S. residents spend time volunteering abroad each year, including nearly 200,000 first- and second-generation immigrants. As skilled migration and the number of U.S. youth with ancestors in the developing world grow, this report shows the potential for diaspora service volunteers to assist with development in a number of countries.

Reports
August 2010

A growing body of evidence suggests that diasporas play a critical role in supporting sustainable development by transferring resources, knowledge, and ideas back to their home countries, and in integrating their countries of origin into the global economy.

Fact Sheets
August 2010

Over 5.3 million U.S. students during the 2007-08 academic year were enrolled in English Language Learner (ELL) programs. This fact sheet examines the states and districts with the highest number and share of ELL students and offers a detailed breakdown of key statistics.

Fact Sheets
August 2010

This fact sheet examines the number and growth of students in U.S. schools in need of English instruction.

Articles

With about 10 percent of Moroccan and Mexican citizens living abroad, remittances have become a vital source of income and poverty alleviation for both countries. Hein de Haas and Simona Vezzoli of the International Migration Institute, University of Oxford explore how migration has affected development and ways to reframe the migration-development debate.

Pages