E.g., 10/20/2020
E.g., 10/20/2020

Africa (sub-Saharan)

Africa (sub-Saharan)

Sub-Saharan Africans migrate to North Africa, Europe, North America, and beyond. The research offered here focuses generally on two aspects of sub-Saharan migration: the outcomes for these migrants and their children once they have settled in their countries of destination, the United States among them, and the roles that diasporas and development policies can play in the economic improvement of these African nations.

Recent Activity

Reports
November 2008
By Wolfgang Lutz, Warren Sanderson, Sergei Scherbov, and Samir K.C.
Reports
November 2008
By Lesleyanne Hawthorne
Policy Briefs
September 2008
By Kathleen Newland, Dovelyn Rannveig Mendoza, and Aaron Terrazas
Articles
Articles
Policy Briefs
July 2008
By Aaron Terrazas, Jamie Durana, and Will Somerville

Pages

The ongoing conflict between the government and a rebel army has displaced the majority of Northern Ugandans. Women and girls are particularly vulnerable, as MPI's Erin Patrick reports.
Beverlee Bruce of the Social Science Research Council provides a field-based look at Liberia's post-conflict reconstruction.
MPI Associate Policy Analyst Erin Patrick maps out the latest developments in the evolving refugee crisis in and around Sudan's Darfur region.
Hania Zlotnik of the UN Population Division focuses on the challenges of analyzing data on migration in Africa.
Aderanti Adepoju of the Human Resources Development Centre in Lagos provides an overview of Africa's dynamic migration flows, examining trends ranging from feminization to diversification.

Pages

Recent Activity

Articles

South Africa, Brazil, and Costa Rica—all destinations for migrants from the region—sought to make the lives of immigrants a little better in 2009.

Books
September, 2009

This book explores how developing-country governments have institutionalized ties with emigrants and their descendents. It offers an unprecedented taxonomy of 45 diaspora-engaging institutions found in 30 developing countries, exploring their activities and objectives. It also provides important practitioner insights from Mali, Mexico, and the Philippines.

Reports
November 2008
This report traces the evolution of the link between international study and skilled migration, outlines policy methods that OECD countries are using to recruit and retain international students, identifies policy challenges through a close examination of existing policies and trends, and predicts how the economic recession will affect future international student flows.
Reports
November 2008

In the next two decades, the world will face two major — and opposing — demographic challenges: rapid population growth and rapid population aging. In an increasingly economically interdependent world, policymakers will simultaneously face a strain on resources caused by population growth and a shortage of labor spurred by the graying of the population.

Policy Briefs
September 2008

This report provides a global look at circular migration experiences, depicts various governments’ attempts at creating circular migration, evaluates the economic costs and benefits of circular migration for sending and receiving countries, identifies components of effective bilateral agreements, and reviews outcomes governments might realistically expect from their circular migration policies.

Articles

Along with increased trade and Chinese investment in Africa has come new migration between the two regions. Malia Politzer places this movement in context and looks at the types of Chinese migrants going to Africa and the Africans going to China.

Articles
South Africa is struggling to define a post-apartheid migration policy that is responsive to its changing role in Africa, the relationship between migration and development, and the country's rampant xenophobia, seen most graphically in May 2008. Jonathan Crush of the Southern African Migration Project reports on the latest developments.
Policy Briefs
July 2008

This brief takes a look at hometown associations (HTAs)—immigrant organizations based on a common hometown—and their often overlooked function as integration intermediaries in their country of destination.

Pages