E.g., 09/24/2022
E.g., 09/24/2022
Transatlantic Council on Migration

Transatlantic Council on Migration

An aerial photo of a small boat at sea
iStock.com/Михаил Руденко

Cooperation with other countries has become a central part of Australian border enforcement. Partnerships with countries such as Indonesia, Cambodia, Nauru, and Papua New Guinea have helped Australia curb irregular maritime migration, but also come at significant costs. This report explores the current and future role of cooperation in Australian immigration enforcement policy.

Vehicles drive down a road near the Tunisia-Libya border with the sun in the background
IOM/Renato Fogal

To address cross-border challenges, the European Union and its Member States have increasingly partnered with neighboring countries, with those in the Maghreb region of northern Africa playing a particularly important role. This report examines the border security situation in the Maghreb and European efforts to work with Maghrebi partners to strengthen border management. It finds a mismatch in priorities stymies cooperation.

At least 20 flags of different countries fly in the wind outside of two large buildings
© FAO/Alessia Pierdomenico

Faced with the pandemic and its economic fallout, many countries have looked inward. Yet the nature and scale of the crisis has vividly illustrated the necessity of working across borders to address transnational challenges. This Transatlantic Council on Migration statement examines how the context for international cooperation has shifted since the Global Compact for Migration was adopted, and reflects on a way forward for migration cooperation.

People walk along the road to the Menara Gardens in Marrakech, Morocco
Eloi_Omella/iStock.com

In the months leading up to the adoption of the Global Compact for Migration in 2018, what had been a quiet negotiation process suddenly became front-page news, drawing unprecedented public attention and sparking protests across Europe. This report explores how the compact negotiations triggered a multilayered institutional and political crisis in the European Union, and how this breakdown continues to affect EU external migration policy.

CBP officer screening travelers
Glenn Fawcett/CBP

What strategic lessons can be learned from the migration- and border-management challenges North America and Europe have faced in recent years? This reflection by a former high-ranking homeland security official explores a range of timely issues, including the need to rethink multilateralism and improve international cooperation, address migrant smuggling, and engage in advanced planning to avoid future crises.

A boy on a boat in a Bangladeshi community affected by river erosion
Amanda Nero/IOM

Climate change is likely to increase the intensity of extreme-weather events already shaping human mobility and displacement. The nature, scale, and direction of future climate-related migration will depend on many factors. This report takes stock of the influence that different combinations of migration, development, and climate policies could have on migration in regions around the world for the 2020-2050 and 2050-2100 periods, using a first-of-its-kind systematic exercise.

Recent Activity

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Reports
October 2008
By  Michael J. White and Inku Subedi
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Reports
October 2008
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Will Somerville and Hiroyuki Tanaka
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Reports
June 2008
By  Elizabeth Collett and Fabian Zuleeg
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Reports
April 2008
By  Rainer Bauböck
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Reports
April 2008
By  Thomas Faist and Jürgen Gerdes

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Recent Activity

Reports
October 2008

This report looks at the trends and emerging demographics in Asia. From 1960 to 2000, the region experienced a major population boom, however, by 2040, the 15-to-34 age group population will start to shrink.

Reports
October 2008

A look at Mexico's slowing population growth, which, coupled with economic developments and changes in U.S. immigration policy (including stricter border control), has resulted in a slight slowdown in Mexican immigration to the United States relative to the 1995 to 2000 period.

Reports
June 2008

This report examines the immigration regimes of European nations, particularly those with points systems and “shortage lists,” and highlights the flaws of such systems which base selection on formal indictors of applicants’ educational qualifications, work experience, previous salary, and occupation.

 

Reports
April 2008

In the Transatlantic Council on Migration’s first statement, the Council concentrates on citizenship, which has become a dynamic policy vehicle for promoting the political incorporation of immigrants and their more complete integration. It is necessary to clarify definitions and imagine broad goals and desired outcomes before attempting to design and implement effective citizenship policies to meet the needs of society as a whole.

Reports
April 2008

This report examines granting local voting rights in municipal elections to resident non-nationals.

Reports
April 2008

More than half of all the states in the world, countries of immigration as well as emigration, now tolerate some form or element of dual citizenship. This report goes beyond statistical trends to the heart of these changes and how best to think through the policy answers.

Reports
April 2008
This report looks at how different citizenship policies produce different integration outcomes. The appropriate policy, therefore, depends directly on what policymakers want to achieve.
Reports
April 2008

Over 100 million migrants live in the more developed regions of the world, including nine million in Northern Europe, 22 million in Western Europe and 38 million in the United States. This report takes a closer look at the challenges of immigration for Western countries.

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