E.g., 07/01/2023
E.g., 07/01/2023

Migration Information Source

An abandoned shoe lies in the mud along the U.S.-Mexico border.
Ariel G. Ruiz Soto

The United States entered a new era with the end of the pandemic-era Title 42 expulsions policy. The government’s hopes of maintaining order at the U.S.-Mexico border post-Title 42 may be complicated by factors including authorities’ limited capacity, ongoing litigation, and cooperation from other countries. This article reviews the Biden administration's changing border policies and possible challenges ahead.

Paintings of the Algerian and Moroccan flags on a brick wall
iStock.com/Gwengoat

Algeria and Morocco sit along a crucial migration corridor between Africa and Europe and have often been defined by their rivalry. Although both have been reluctant to welcome large numbers of sub-Saharan African migrants, their motivations have been different. And historically, their approaches to emigration have been a study in contrasts. This article explores the factors driving migration policy in these two countries.

People hold flags of Central American nations at a march in San Diego.
iStock.com/shakzu

Central Americans comprise less than one-tenth of the overall U.S. foreign-born population, but their numbers have grown tenfold since 1980, amid economic challenges, political crises, and natural disasters in their region. This article provides a comprehensive look at this population.

A Palestinian woman in Bani Naeem, in the West Bank.
© FAO/Marco Longari

Palestinians constitute the world’s longest protracted refugee situation and largest stateless community. Yet their plight has often been eclipsed by more recent displacement crises and dismissed as unsolvable. Other factors have contributed to Palestinian refugees’ situation, including the near impossibility of obtaining citizenship in many host countries and precarious funding for support, as this article explains.

A border checkpoint between Canada and the United States.
iStock.com/mphillips007

The revised U.S.-Canada Safe Third Country Agreement closes what critics call a loophole that incentivizes unauthorized border crossings of asylum seekers. While responding to Canadian concerns of increasing irregular arrivals from the United States, the change—taken in tandem with U.S. moves at the U.S.-Mexico border—suggests that the Biden administration increasingly wants to rely on neighboring countries to respond to rising asylum claims.

Venezuelan migrants at the Colombian border.
IOM/Angela Wells

Political and economic crises, new free-movement arrangements, and other trends are transforming countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, a region once known primarily for its emigration. The number of immigrants living in the region has nearly doubled since 2010, an incredible change in a short period of time. This article makes sense of a profound transition underway in the Western Hemisphere.

Recent Articles

France's traditions of secularism and Roman Catholicism are being tested as the country tries to integrate a growing Muslim population, according to Patrick Simon of INED.
Veysel Oezcan of Humboldt University Berlin reports on how fewer foreign residents of Germany are obtaining citizenship under the provisions of a citizenship law passed in 2000.

MPI's Maia Jachimowicz maps out the challenges ahead for Argentina, which is witnessing an outflow of people amidst continuing economic hardships.

Justice Dept. Report Cites Abuse of Detainees After Sept. 11... Court Approves Ongoing Secrecy on Post-Sept. 11 Detainees' Names... Hispanics Become Largest Minority in the United States... Post-Sept. 11 Economic Woes Squeeze H-1B Visa Program...
Frank Laczko of the IOM examines how increasing numbers of Chinese immigrants are entering Europe.

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