E.g., 03/26/2023
E.g., 03/26/2023

Migration Information Source

A displaced Ukrainian in Prague.
© UNHCR/Michal Novotný

High-skilled immigration represents a potential major benefit to Czechia, which has undergone rapid economic growth since the transition from communism. The arrival of hundreds of thousands of new Ukrainians, many of whom are well educated, marks a moment for the country to re-evaluate its integration policies, as this article details.

A flag hangs at the vice president's residence at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, DC.
Petty Officer 2nd Class Sean Hur/DOD

Want to check a fact about U.S. immigration? Interested in putting recent trends into perspective? This article compiles authoritative, up-to-date information about the U.S. immigrant population and how it has changed over time. Data cover immigrants' demographic, educational, and linguistic characteristics; their top states of residence; enforcement activities; refugees and asylum seekers; naturalization trends; visa backlogs; and more.

Crossers at the Nicaragua-Costa Rica border
World Bank

A political crisis marked by Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega’s growing authoritarianism has sparked the largest emigration in the country’s modern history. Hundreds of thousands have fled, including intellectuals, artists, and academics. They increasingly are heading beyond the traditional destination of Costa Rica, to the United States and beyond, as this article details.

Women with children and a donkey in Ethiopia.
© FAO/Michael Tewelde

Can haphazard, unplanned climate displacement be turned into voluntary, safe migration? Projects explicitly aimed at addressing internal and international climate migration are rare, but development organizations increasingly are turning their attention to supporting them. This article catalogues climate mobility projects around the world and examines their primary goals, whether to support the movement or stay of people or help at destination.

President Joe Biden in the White House.
Adam Schultz/White House

Pandemic-related U.S. policies have led to more than 2.6 million migrant expulsions at the U.S.-Mexico border, expanded public benefits to cover millions more U.S. residents, and offered free COVID-19 vaccines and treatment. Many of these policies are now likely to end as the Biden administration in May 2023 formally declares the pandemic to be over, although what comes next remains unclear.

Asylum seekers from Venezuela in Texas.
© UNHCR/Nicolo Filippo Rosso

Venezuelans comprise one of the fastest-growing immigrant groups in the United States, nearly tripling in size from 2010 to 2021. Much of this migration has been fueled by crisis in Venezuela, where political unrest and economic strife have caused millions to flee since 2015, most remaining in Latin America. Venezuelan immigrants are far more likely than the overall foreign- and U.S.-born populations to have a college degree. Take an in-depth look at this immigrant population.

Recent Articles

Cultivating sustained cooperation between source and destination states is essential to migration management. Susan Martin, director of the Institute for the Study of International Migration at Georgetown University; Philip Martin, professor of agricultural and resource economics at UC Davis; and Patrick Weil, senior research fellow of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), tackle this issue.
Court Rules Secret Deportation Hearings Unconstitutional... Major Changes to Board of Immigration Appeals... New LPRs Break One Million Mark... U.S., Canada Agree to Final Draft of Safe Third Country Agreement... Refugee Admissions Fall Below Target... President Signs Child Status Protection Act...
Germany's two biggest political parties have come out in favor of Islamic education for the country's estimated 350,000 Muslim schoolchildren.
What does integration mean in a dynamic and culturally diverse socio-political context? MPI Policy Analyst Brian Ray examines the difficulties that lie ahead for policy makers.

Will President Putin realize his dream of a mass return of the Russian diaspora? Timothy Heleniak of the World Bank and Georgetown University's Center for Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies assesses Russia's migration dilemma.

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