E.g., 06/22/2024
E.g., 06/22/2024

Migration Information Source

A sign for a Chinese restaurant in Lima's Chinatown district.
iStock.com/marktucan

Immigration from China and Japan to Peru in the 19th and 20th centuries has had a lasting impact on the South American country. These immigrants arrived to fill labor market needs, but later encountered a backlash from native Peruvians. Now, amid an influx of Venezuelans fleeing political strife and economic collapse, the past may be repeating itself. This article provides an overview of historical Asian migration to Peru, drawing a parallel to recent experiences with Venezuelans.

An immigrant from Iraq living in Michigan.
Jetta Disco/DHS

Immigration to the United States from the Middle East and North Africa is longstanding and multifaceted. Compared to other immigrants, those from the Middle East and North Africa are more likely to be proficient in English, have graduated college, and be a U.S. citizen. This article provides an overview of this population, more than one-quarter of which lives in the greater New York, Detroit, or Los Angeles areas.

Dublin street scene in Temple Bar area.
iStock.com/kelvinjay

Tens of millions of people globally claim Irish heritage, due to the country’s long history of emigration to places such as the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia. In recent years, many more people have been moving to Ireland than leaving, providing benefits to the country but also posing challenges. This article provides an overview of Ireland's migration trends and policies, past and present.

People in South Sudan fleeing conflict in Sudan.
Jesuit Refugee Service

The international humanitarian protection system built amid the ashes of World War II has come under increasing strain, as record numbers of people flee internationally and travel farther distances. New barriers to protection in destination countries have captured public attention, but governments are also experimenting with ways to offer sanctuary, which could signal a remaking of the global system, as this article explains.

Dancers at the Basilica of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico City.
Laura Elizabeth Pohl for Bread for the World

Mexico is the source of the world’s second-largest migrant population. In recent years the country has found itself at an unexpected crossroads: Managing the transit of growing numbers of asylum seekers and other migrants headed to the United States. Meanwhile, the Mexican-born population in the United States has declined significantly since 2010. This article provides an overview of the major trends and policies.

Immigrants arriving on a ferry near Ellis Island.
National Archives

The Immigration Act of 1924 shaped the U.S. population over the course of the 20th century, greatly restricting immigration and ensuring that arriving immigrants were mostly from Northern and Western Europe. The century-old law was one of the most restrictive in U.S. history and helped create the framework for key provisions of the U.S. immigration system that remain in place a century later. This article analyzes the effect and legacy of the 1924 law.

Recent Articles

LBJ 1965 Act Helicopter YoichiOkamoto LBJLibrary

Signed into law 50 years ago, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 had several unintended consequences that have had a profound effect on the flow of immigrants to the United States and contributed to the transformation of the U.S. demographic profile. This Policy Beat explores the law's lasting impact and lessons for policymaking today.

IOM IOMandJapanhelpSyrians Flickr

Japan is one of the world's most generous contributors to humanitarian appeals, yet accepts a very small number of asylum seekers—indeed only 11 were granted refugee status in 2014. Even as Japan has witnessed a record number of asylum applications, the approval rate has declined. This feature explores Japan's low acceptance of asylum seekers, including institutional barriers and negative public perceptions.

permanent SarahSosiak Flickr

The annual inflow of new lawful permanent residents (LPRs), also known as green-card holders, has ebbed and flowed with changes in U.S. immigration policy and processing backlogs. This data Spotlight delves into legal immigration in the United States, covering class of admission, country of origin, destination states, and more.

RefugeesinFYRM StephenRyanIFRC Flickr

As Europe struggles to reach a consensus on how to respond to the refugee crisis, the seemingly unending flow of migrants and refugees arriving on its shores is bringing national asylum systems to their breaking point. This article analyzes the context of the crisis, discussing the root causes of the flows, why they are spiking now, and growing protection challenges.

KarnesDetentionBedroom CharlesReed ICE

Facing legal setbacks and political opposition, the Obama administration may be required to overhaul its policy of detaining families in immigration custody. Recent court decisions have undermined the government's justification of the policy as a deterrent to future illegal immigration and may result in the release of more than 1,400 unauthorized immigrant women and children.

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Veysel Oezcan of Humboldt University Berlin reports on a Swiss ruling that bars communities from holding plebiscites to approve or reject naturalization applications.

An Australian Senate committee is proposing that agricultural workers from the Pacific Islands be granted special seasonal access to Australia, according to Christine Inglis.

Rob Paral of Roosevelt University's Institute for Metropolitan Affairs examines the key role of recent immigrants in one of the United States' largest cities.

The efforts of Nordic countries to provide safe harbor to refugees are outlined by Mette Honore, Senior Legal Consultant to the Danish Refugee Council.
MPI's Kevin O'Neil takes a close look at how Taiwan has reaped economic benefits from high-skilled migration.

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