E.g., 06/14/2024
E.g., 06/14/2024
International Program

International Program

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak at a press conference
Simon Walker/No. 10 Downing Street

With UK voters headed to the polls on July 4, one thing is clear: Whatever party wins the election will face the ongoing challenges of addressing irregular arrivals by boat and growing asylum claims. But this could also be an opportunity for novel policy approaches and collaboration with international partners in Europe and beyond, this commentary argues.

Governmental leaders at the May 2024 Los Angeles Declaration ministerial meeting in Guatemala
Chuck Kennedy/State Department

Two years after signing the Los Angeles Declaration on Migration and Protection, governments from across the Americas met in Guatemala to assess the state of cooperation in the hemisphere. Working with nongovernmental and international organizations, they also produced an agenda for practical action for the next year, as this commentary explains.

Young women at a vocational education and training center in Morocco
Dana Smillie/World Bank

In the global race for talent, governments in Europe and beyond are exploring ways to attract workers with needed skills. At the same time, some lower- and middle-income countries are seeking to expand their nationals’ access to economic opportunities abroad. This policy brief examines employment- and skills-based mobility projects that seek to facilitate the movement of workers with in-demand skills, including their unique value-add and common challenges.

Young boy smiles out the window of a bus at a transit center in Ethiopia
IOM/Muse Mohammed

While human mobility globally has largely recovered from its pandemic-era drop, it is undergoing considerable change. The causes are diverse, from climate shocks and shifting economic conditions to conflict-induced displacement. This report explores how the scale and characteristics of cross-border movement are evolving post-pandemic, featuring case studies from different world regions.

Image of female worker at the Boqueria market in Barcelona making a crepe
Marcel Crozet/ILO

Spain and the United States both receive their greatest number of immigrants from Latin America, and have worked collaboratively together on displacement crises and other migration issues. As shared immigration challenges dominate debate on both sides of the Atlantic, Spain can serve as a vital bridge in the policy conversation, this commentary notes.

Volunteer hands out food to migrant workers returning to their hometowns in Vietnam
IOM/Red Cross Vietnam

The COVID-19 pandemic both shocked the global mobility system and reaffirmed the centrality and resiliency of human mobility. Four years on, public and political attention to COVID-19’s unprecedented consequences for cross-border movement has waned. Yet if countries are to manage mobility more effectively in future public-health crises, this is an important moment for reflection and learning, as this issue brief explores.

Recent Activity

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Reports
January 2009
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Annette Heuser
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Reports
November 2008
By  Wolfgang Lutz, Warren Sanderson, Sergei Scherbov and Samir K.C.
cover talent21stCentury
Reports
November 2008
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Will Somerville and Hiroyuki Tanaka
cover TCM_growingGlobalDemandSkilledMigrants
Reports
November 2008
By  Lesleyanne Hawthorne
cover TCM_Zuniga_Paper
Reports
October 2008
By  Elena Zúñiga and Miguel Molina

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Recent Activity

Reports
January 2009

This report seeks to understand and predict the potential impact of the economic crisis that began in December 2007 on legal and illegal immigration flows to and from the United States, and the likely effects of an economic downturn on the labor market performance of immigrants.

Reports
January 2009

This short briefing paper explores the potential effects of the economic crisis with respect to immigration across European Union Member States, and outlines how policymakers might respond to changing patterns of migrant inflows and outflows, and the consequences of the downturn on immigrants and their host communities.

 

Reports
November 2008
This report traces the evolution of the link between international study and skilled migration, outlines policy methods that OECD countries are using to recruit and retain international students, identifies policy challenges through a close examination of existing policies and trends, and predicts how the economic recession will affect future international student flows.
Reports
November 2008

This report explores the need for nations to adjust their thinking and policy toward attracting the coveted elite class of highly skilled global talent as emerging and middle-income countries increasingly attempt to woo back their nationals and engage their diaspora to help move their economy forward.

Reports
November 2008

In the next two decades, the world will face two major — and opposing — demographic challenges: rapid population growth and rapid population aging. In an increasingly economically interdependent world, policymakers will simultaneously face a strain on resources caused by population growth and a shortage of labor spurred by the graying of the population.

Reports
November 2008

The Middle East and Northern Africa (MENA) and Europe appear to be an ideal demographic match: the former has a large supply of young, active workers, and the latter has a shortage of the youthful, skilled or unskilled labor it needs to sustain its economic competitiveness. MENA is the source of 20 million first-generation migrants, half of them now living in another MENA country and most of the rest in Europe. The region also hosts around the same number within its borders. In addition, the size of MENA’s working-age population will continue to rise sharply in the next two decades while the corresponding segment of the population in Europe will soon start to decline.

Reports
October 2008

This report examines the advantages and disadvantages of two fundamentally different approaches to economic migrant selection—demand driven and employer led systems and human-capital-accumulation focused and government led systems, best illustrated by “points systems,” which apportion numerical values to desirable human-capital characteristics.

Reports
October 2008

China and India are major players in international migration. Both countries have very large populations that will continue to grow in the coming years. The available pool of potential migrants from China and India will remain high although population size and density (known as demographic variability) will change from year to year in both countries.

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