E.g., 01/25/2022
E.g., 01/25/2022
International Program

International Program

People walk along the road to the Menara Gardens in Marrakech, Morocco
Eloi_Omella/iStock.com

In the months leading up to the adoption of the Global Compact for Migration in 2018, what had been a quiet negotiation process suddenly became front-page news, drawing unprecedented public attention and sparking protests across Europe. This report explores how the compact negotiations triggered a multilayered institutional and political crisis in the European Union, and how this breakdown continues to affect EU external migration policy.

Photo of woman in lab in Abuja, Nigeria testing for COVID-19
Natalie Oren/IOM

The world is once again engaging in a mad scramble to close borders after emergence of the COVID-19 Omicron variant. While the response bears the hallmarks of the initial response to COVID-19 and the Delta variant, with an uncoordinated and single-minded focus on travel restrictions alone, international cooperation and long-term planning are critical to a more equitable and sustainable system of global mobility and pandemic preparedness.

People walking across the bridge over the Sixaola River at the border between Panama and Costa Rica
Joel Carillet/iStock.com

Within Latin America, Costa Rica is a top destination for migrants and refugees from a range of countries and with different characteristics and migration intentions. This report examines the institutional framework and capacity of the country’s migration system, with a focus on immigrant integration in four policy areas: regularization and registration, health, employment, and education.

A Honduran man and child
WFP/Julian Frank

Influenced by a mix of factors—from economic and humanitarian protection needs to family reunification and climate change—Central American migration is a dynamic phenomenon. This report draws on unique survey data to examine the conditions that drive people in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras to migrate, as well as the costs and implications of migration for households and communities throughout the region.

Organic Blue Corn from a farm in New Mexico
USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service New Mexico

There is increasing recognition that the United States, Mexico, and migrant-origin countries in Central America will need to work together to address the large-scale, irregular movement of people through the region. While it is critical to improve humanitarian protection for those in need, expanding legal opportunities to take up employment abroad is another part of this equation, as this policy brief explores.

A word cloud of terms and topics that frequently feature in migration narratives
MPI, using Free Word Cloud Generator

As migration levels rise, societies are facing competing narratives about immigration. Often, there is dissonance between top-down narratives from political leaders and bottom-up narratives spread through personal and media engagement. This report explores positive and negative narratives around migration in Colombia, Lebanon, Morocco, Sweden, and the United States to determine the contexts in which some stick while others fail.

Recent Activity

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Recent Activity

Reports
September 2014
In April 2014, MPI's Transatlantic Council on Migration convened an extraordinary meeting with city-level officials from Rotterdam to discuss the potential that "urban citizenship" offers for building new identities at the local level. This Council Statement focuses on the identity crisis that many cities are facing and offers strategies to unite cities, expand services for diverse groups, and foster community cohesion.
Reports
September 2014
As the initial point of contact for most immigrants, cities see firsthand how both local and national policies affect newcomers and minorities. This report explores the steps cities across Europe are taking to be more inclusive of immigrants and minorities and how these efforts relate to national policies.
Reports
September 2014
Large immigration flows challenge destination cities to find innovative ways to meet the needs of immigrant residents and promote their integration. This report examines the successful integration strategies of five U.S. cities—Cupertino and San Francisco, CA; Littleton, CO; New York City; and Seattle—and offers lessons for local governments looking to implement their own initiatives.
Reports
September 2014
Where does residential segregation come from, and why does it vary significantly across minority groups and country contexts? This report explores these questions and examines the policy tools that lawmakers on both sides of the Atlantic have used to address the segregation of immigrant groups.
Reports
August 2014
As global demand for talent and human capital increases, cities are becoming more innovative in their efforts to attract and retain residents. Many cities in Europe and North America are now turning to branding strategies to build inclusive identities that appeal to both new and existing residents. This report examines branding strategies and challenges.
Reports
October 2014
This report presents an overview of Czech integration policies, with a special focus on economic integration. It focuses on policies designed to support migrants’ incorporation in the Czech labor market, and assesses the extent to which these policies facilitate migrants’ upward mobility into more skilled work.
Reports
August 2014
Although immigrants are more likely to start businesses than their native-born peers, immigrant businesses have significantly lower survival rates. This Transatlantic Council on Migration report examines the obstacles facing immigrant entrepreneurs and offers policy recommendations for local and national governments looking to more fully reap the benefits of immigrant entrepreneurship.
Reports
September 2014
Sweden’s strong economic record continues to be marred by its struggles to integrate immigrants, especially those who come through humanitarian or family channels. This report describes how Sweden is trying to overcome these labor market integration challenges and analyzes how successful its workforce development and integration policies have been in helping immigrants progress from low-skilled work to middle-skilled jobs.

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