E.g., 04/20/2024
E.g., 04/20/2024
International Program

International Program

Image of female worker at the Boqueria market in Barcelona making a crepe
Marcel Crozet/ILO

Spain and the United States both receive their greatest number of immigrants from Latin America, and have worked collaboratively together on displacement crises and other migration issues. As shared immigration challenges dominate debate on both sides of the Atlantic, Spain can serve as a vital bridge in the policy conversation, this commentary notes.

Volunteer hands out food to migrant workers returning to their hometowns in Vietnam
IOM/Red Cross Vietnam

The COVID-19 pandemic both shocked the global mobility system and reaffirmed the centrality and resiliency of human mobility. Four years on, public and political attention to COVID-19’s unprecedented consequences for cross-border movement has waned. Yet if countries are to manage mobility more effectively in future public-health crises, this is an important moment for reflection and learning, as this issue brief explores.

A woman in Nigeria smiles while using her mobile phone
iStock.com/Wirestock

Remittances are a vital lifeline for migrants’ families around the world and an important source of revenue for many low- and middle-income countries, especially in times of crisis. As more people turn to digital financial technologies for these money transfers, this shift holds the potential to shake up the rigid remittance industry and boost development benefits. But it also brings new challenges, as this report explores.

Three refugee students at airport security check
© UNHCR/Alessandro Penso

Travel documents are critical facilitators of mobility. But for refugees, who cannot safely use a passport issued by their origin country, the lack of a usable travel document can shut them out of work, study, or other opportunities beyond their first country of asylum. This policy brief examines alternative documents that can facilitate refugees’ movement, key barriers to acquiring them, and strategies for overcoming these challenges.

Ukrainian adults and children arrive at a train station in Hungary
IOM/Muse Mohammed

The massive and rapid displacement of Syrians, Venezuelans, and Ukrainians presented neighboring countries with an impossible task: providing legal status and assistance, even though their asylum systems lacked the capacity to handle such a large influx. This report examines the costs and benefits of the flexible approaches taken to providing status in these three cases, identifying lessons for future crises.

A migrant worker cuts through a metal rod at a construction site in Qatar
Apex Image/ILO

With more people moving abroad for work and events such as the 2022 World Cup in Qatar highlighting the risks migrant workers can face, questions about how international recruitment occurs have received increased scrutiny. This policy brief explores the notable progress that has been made in establishing fair and ethical recruitment standards, and identifies key areas for future attention by governments, employers, and recruiters.

Recent Activity

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Reports
April 2008
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Annette Heuser and Hans Martens
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Fact Sheets
December 2007
By  Hiroyuki Tanaka
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Reports
October 2007
By  Deborah W. Meyers, Rey Koslowski and Susan Ginsburg
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Reports
October 2007
By  Jonathan Laurence
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Reports
September 2007
By  Paul Leseman
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Policy Briefs
September 2007
By  Gayle Christensen and Petra Stanat
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Reports
September 2007
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Gregory A. Maniatis
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Policy Briefs
September 2007
By  Maurice Crul

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Recent Activity

Reports
April 2008

This paper proposes a stakeholder principle that should guide citizenship policies in Europe and North America. This principle applies to both immigrants and emigrants. Stakeholders in this sense are those who have a stake in the polity’s future because of the circumstances of their lives.

Fact Sheets
December 2007

This Fact Sheet outlines the common rules and policies of Schengen Member States that have abolished controls at internal borders, the regulations for EU and third-country nationals who wish to enter and reside in the Schengen Area, and the function and mechanism of the “Schengen visa.”

Reports
October 2007

This brief examines the role of intercultural dialogue as a tool for strengthening relations between European governments and the Muslim community, reinforcing religious freedoms, and tackling issues of racism and extremism.

Reports
October 2007

This report, the product of two workshops held on border management in Belgium and Texas, addresses three arenas of significant change shared by the United States and the European Union: 1) new government organizations for controlling borders; 2) the use of information technology to secure borders; and 3) visa‐free travel policies.

Policy Briefs
September 2007

This policy brief analyzes the effectiveness of school language policies across 14 immigrant-receiving countries. It examines various methods countries have adopted to help immigrant students gain proficiency in the language of instruction, identifies contexts that seem to elicit positive outcomes, and provides recommendations.

Reports
September 2007

This policy brief outlines the causes of educational disadvantage among young children of immigrants and explores strategies for improving their educational and socioeconomic outlook.

Policy Briefs
September 2007

This policy brief examines the social mobility prospects of the children of Turkish immigrants across five EU nations—Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, and the Netherlands—and seeks to identify institutional arrangements that promote their academic success and transition into the labor market.

Reports
September 2007

This report examines the ways in which governments can make the emerging global mobility system work better for European migrant-receiving countries, their developing-country partners, and the migrants themselves.

Pages