E.g., 11/23/2017
E.g., 11/23/2017

Resources on the 40th Anniversary of the Fall of Saigon

Resources on the 40th Anniversary of the Fall of Saigon

U.S. military archives

The fall of Saigon on April 30, 1975 and the culmination of the Vietnam War led to the U.S.-sponsored evacuation of approximately 125,000 Vietnamese refugees in a first wave and hundreds of thousands more during the two-decade long Indonchinese refugee crisis, creating what would become one of the United States' largest foreign-born groups. These resources detail the changing nature of migration flows to and from Vietnam as well as the historical and current sociodemographic characteristics of Vietnamese immigrants and their children in the United States, including geographic distribution, educational and professional attainment, remittance trends, and more.

 


 

From Humanitarian to Economic: The Changing Face of Vietnamese Migration

The end of the Vietnam war precipitated the mass Indochinese refugee crisis, which saw more than 2 million people flee the region, often on unseaworthy boats. Following the war, Vietnamese migration was divided between humanitarian flows to the West, and labor migrants to allied communist countries. More recently, Vietnam's rapid economic growth has prompted increased labor migration to Asia and a rise in migrant brides. This article examines the changing nature of Vietnamese migration.

Vietnamese Immigrants in the United States

The once-tiny population of Vietnamese immigrants in the United States has grown to become the country’s sixth largest foreign-born group in the span of several decades. This data profile examines the Vietnamese immigrant population by size, recency of arrival, top states and cities of settlement, college education, sending of remittances, and much more.

The Vietnamese Diaspora in the United States

Vietnamese immigrants and their U.S.-born children comprise one of the largest diaspora populations in the United States, at 1.8 million individuals. A large proportion of the first generation arrived as refugees in the aftermath of the Vietnam War, and these origins have shaped the diaspora's experience in the United States. This profile examines population size, educational attainment, household income, employment patterns, geographic distribution, and remittance volume for Vietnamese immigrants and their children.