E.g., 08/11/2020
E.g., 08/11/2020

Human Services Initiative

Human Services Initiative

MPI’s Human Services Initiative focuses on a range of immigration issues affecting children, families, and health- and human services programs and policies in the United States. The Initiative produces research, policy analysis, private convenings, public events, and technical assistance to inform federal, state, and local policies and practice. Current areas of work include:

  • Refugee Resettlement. MPI conducts research and delivers technical assistance to strengthen family-focused refugee resettlement services. These efforts include a national policy academy that supports state efforts to advance two-generation strategies in refugee resettlement, with particular attention to services for young children, supports for youth transitioning to adulthood, and better job strategies for adults.
  • Unaccompanied Children. MPI analyzes policies and programs that affect unaccompanied minors while they are in federal custody and after they have been released to parents or other sponsors in local communities. MPI engages providers, governments, community-based organizations, and others to improve services to unaccompanied children based on child development and child welfare principles.
  • Access to Benefits and Services. In the context of public-charge requirements and fears of engaging with public systems, MPI partners with governmental and nongovernmental stakeholders to address challenges in connecting individuals and families with benefits and services. This aspect of MPI’s work includes attention to linkages to benefits and services for asylees, asylum seekers, and children of immigrants.

Recent Activity

Reports
December 2018
By Mark Greenberg, Julia Gelatt, Jessica Bolter, Essey Workie, and Isabelle Charo
Policy Briefs
November 2018
By Randy Capps, Mark Greenberg, Michael Fix, and Jie Zong
Commentaries
August 2018
By Jeanne Batalova, Michael Fix, and Mark Greenberg

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Recent Activity

Video, Audio, Webinars
December 13, 2018

On this webinar, MPI researchers and Utah and Colorado refugee coordinators explore promising practices to better serve refugee families, including education services for refugee youth, innovative efforts to secure better jobs for adult refugees, and other services designed to aid integration over time. They also discuss the potential for implementing and supporting two-generation approaches to refugee integration at a time when the system’s funding and capacity are in peril.  

Reports
December 2018

At a time when the U.S. refugee resettlement system is facing unprecedented challenges, innovative and cost-effective tools for supporting refugee integration are in demand. This report explores how a two-generation approach to service provision could help all members of refugee families—from young children to working-age adults and the elderly—find their footing.

Policy Briefs
November 2018

Most recent U.S. legal permanent residents could have found themselves at risk of green-card denial had they been assessed under a proposed Trump administration public-charge rule that would apply a significantly expanded test to determine likelihood of future public-benefits use. This analysis finds the effects would fall most heavily on women, children, and the elderly, while potentially shifting legal immigration away from Latin America.

Commentaries
August 2018

A Trump administration “public-charge” rule expected to be unveiled soon could create the potential to significantly reshape family-based legal immigration to the United States—and reduce arrivals from Asia, Latin America, and Africa—by imposing a de facto financial test that 40 percent of the U.S. born themselves would fail, as this commentary explains.

Video, Audio, Webinars
June 12, 2018

This webinar highlights findings from an MPI report examining the potential impacts of expected changes to the public charge rule by the Trump administration. Leaked draft versions suggest the rule could sharply expand the number of legally present noncitizens facing difficulty getting a green card or extending a visa as a result of their family's use of public benefits. The rule likely would discourage millions from accessing health, nutrition, and social services for which they or their U.S.-citizen dependents are eligible.

Reports
June 2018

According to leaked drafts, the Trump administration is considering a rule that could have sweeping effects on both legal immigration to the United States and the use of public benefits by legal immigrants and their families. This report examines the potential scale of the expected rule’s impact, including at national and state levels and among children, as well as Hispanic and Asian American/Pacific Islander immigrants.

Commentaries
February 2017

A draft executive order apparently under consideration by the Trump administration could have widespread chilling effects for legal immigrants—both those already in the United States as well as prospective ones who seek to reunify with U.S. relatives. It proposes restricting green cards for low-income immigrants and making legal permanent residents more vulnerable to deportation if they use federal means-tested public benefits.

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