E.g., 06/26/2024
E.g., 06/26/2024
Global Skills and Talent Initiative

Global Skills and Talent Initiative

Economic shifts, demographic pressures, technological advances, and difficulties recruiting and retaining workers during the COVID-19 pandemic are buffeting labor markets in rapid and at times unpredictable ways and contributing to growing labor shortages. This, in turn, has fueled discussions about the potential role for immigration.

MPI’s Global Skills and Talent Initiative explores the role immigration can play in addressing current and future workforce needs in rapidly evolving labor markets, with a particular focus on employment-based immigration and the supports that can help immigrants apply their full range of educational and professional skills. MPI’s premise is that decisions about immigration policy need to form part of a broader strategy on skills and talent that takes into account economic, social, and national interest considerations and can bring together government, private-sector, and civil-society viewpoints.

The Initiative’s work aims to answer five animating questions:

  • What role can immigration and immigrant integration play in meeting labor market needs?
  • How can immigration support competitiveness in high-growth sectors?
  • What does the future hold for low-wage immigration?
  • How can governments support and promote immigrant entrepreneurship and innovation?
  • What are the implications of remote work for immigration systems?

Over the last two decades, MPI has produced essential original research and insights on U.S. and global immigration selection systems, recruitment policies, credential recognition, immigrant integration, immigrant contributions to the economy, and workforce development for first- and second-generation immigrants. The work collected here showcases research produced for the Initiative and curates some of the most on-point work that MPI has done over the years with regards to 1) human capital and skills; 2) immigrant selection systems; 3) labor market integration; 4) the future of work; 5) migration partnerships; and 6) harnessing the benefits of immigration.

Recent Activity

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Reports
October 2018
By  Meghan Benton and Liam Patuzzi
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Policy Briefs
September 2018
By  Kate Hooper
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Commentaries
June 2017
By  Jeanne Batalova and Michael Fix
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Reports
February 2017
By  Margie McHugh and Madeleine Morawski
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Reports
February 2017
By  Jeanne Batalova, Andriy Shymonyak and Guntur Sugiyarto

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Recent Activity

Reports
February 2019

As European countries launch ambitious new legal migration partnerships with several origin and transit countries in Africa, this report takes stock of the long and mixed history of such projects. To make the most of their potential to encourage skills development and fill pressing labor gaps, policymakers will need to think carefully about the partners and sectors they choose, among other key considerations.

Reports
October 2018

European labor markets are poised to change significantly in the coming years as technological advancements and other forces reshape the world of work. While these developments will affect all workers, they have particular implications for immigrant integration. This report breaks down the factors driving change and explores promising policy innovations to help societies better prepare for it.  

Policy Briefs
September 2018

While partnerships to facilitate skilled migration have had mixed success in the past, the Global Compact for Migration is advancing a new approach that may change this. This policy brief compares this new partnership model with the traditional one, highlighting the questions policymakers will need to answer if they are to encourage mobility, sustain employer engagement, and see development benefits in countries of origin.

Reports
March 2018

In low-wage industries, from construction to food service, labor-standards violations have become widespread—with major consequences for law-abiding employers, state tax revenue, and native-born and immigrant workers. As the federal government steps back from workplace regulation, this report examines the innovative approaches conservative and liberal states alike are using to enforce labor standards more strategically.

Reports
December 2017

As destination countries look for ways to better manage migration, many are seeking to build or strengthen collaboration with origin and transit countries. While many partnerships share similar goals—limiting arrivals, returning unauthorized migrants, and addressing migration’s root causes—their outcomes vary. This Transatlantic Council Statement examines the factors behind these mixed results and offers recommendations to make partnerships succeed.

Commentaries
June 2017

A recent MPI study reveals that 48 percent of recent immigrants to the United States were college graduates, a sharp increase over earlier periods. How can the United States better leverage this brain gain? This commentary outlines some policies that could allow the United States to more fully utilize the professional and academic credentials that highly skilled immigrants have, for their benefit and that of the U.S. economy.

Reports
February 2017

Nearly 2 million college-educated immigrants in the United States, more than half coming with academic and professional credentials, are unable to fully utilize their professional skills and instead are stuck in low-skilled work or are unemployed. This report explores a range of programs and policies that are providing cutting-edge career navigation, relicensing, gap filling, and job search assistance to remedy this brain waste.

Reports
February 2017

Given diverging demographics, rising educational attainment and wide variation in economic opportunities, countries in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations are poised to see an expansion of both the demand for and supply of skilled migrants willing and able to move. The convergence of these megatrends represents unique opportunities for human-capital development and brain circulation, as this report explores.

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