E.g., 06/30/2024
E.g., 06/30/2024
Global Skills and Talent Initiative

Global Skills and Talent Initiative

Economic shifts, demographic pressures, technological advances, and difficulties recruiting and retaining workers during the COVID-19 pandemic are buffeting labor markets in rapid and at times unpredictable ways and contributing to growing labor shortages. This, in turn, has fueled discussions about the potential role for immigration.

MPI’s Global Skills and Talent Initiative explores the role immigration can play in addressing current and future workforce needs in rapidly evolving labor markets, with a particular focus on employment-based immigration and the supports that can help immigrants apply their full range of educational and professional skills. MPI’s premise is that decisions about immigration policy need to form part of a broader strategy on skills and talent that takes into account economic, social, and national interest considerations and can bring together government, private-sector, and civil-society viewpoints.

The Initiative’s work aims to answer five animating questions:

  • What role can immigration and immigrant integration play in meeting labor market needs?
  • How can immigration support competitiveness in high-growth sectors?
  • What does the future hold for low-wage immigration?
  • How can governments support and promote immigrant entrepreneurship and innovation?
  • What are the implications of remote work for immigration systems?

Over the last two decades, MPI has produced essential original research and insights on U.S. and global immigration selection systems, recruitment policies, credential recognition, immigrant integration, immigrant contributions to the economy, and workforce development for first- and second-generation immigrants. The work collected here showcases research produced for the Initiative and curates some of the most on-point work that MPI has done over the years with regards to 1) human capital and skills; 2) immigrant selection systems; 3) labor market integration; 4) the future of work; 5) migration partnerships; and 6) harnessing the benefits of immigration.

Recent Activity

SeasonalWorkerCommentary ClausBunks Flickr
Commentaries
March 2020
By  Kate Hooper and Camille Le Coz
Coverthumb Orrenius Zavodny Gullo LaborMarket
Policy Briefs
August 2019
By  Pia M. Orrenius, Madeline Zavodny and Stephanie Gullo
Coverthumb MPI Holzer Future US Labor Market
Policy Briefs
August 2019
By  Harry J. Holzer
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Reports
July 2019
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Meghan Benton and Kate Hooper
Competing Approaches to Selecting Economic Immigrants: Points-Based vs. Demand-Driven Systems
Reports
April 2019
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Kate Hooper

Pages

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Reports
December 2016
By  Jeanne Batalova, Michael Fix and James D. Bachmeier
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Reports
November 2008
By  Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Will Somerville and Hiroyuki Tanaka

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Recent Activity

Commentaries
April 2020

In a time of critical shortages of U.S. health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, retired doctors are being called back to work and medical students are graduating on a fast track. There is another important pool that could be tapped: Immigrants and refugees who have college degrees in health fields but are working in low-skilled jobs or out of work. MPI estimates 263,000 immigrants are experiencing skill underutilization and could be a valuable resource.

Commentaries
March 2020

As governments have reacted to the coronavirus pandemic by closing borders, seasonal workers have been kept out, raising a pressing question: who is going to produce the food amid agricultural labor shortages? Policymakers in the Asia Pacific, Europe, and North America have responded by seeking to recruit residents, lengthen stays for already present seasonal workers, and find ways to continue admitting foreign seasonal labor, as this commentary explores.

Policy Briefs
August 2019

The U.S. economy is facing an uncertain future as an aging workforce, stagnating labor force participation, skill mismatches, and automation reshape the labor market. This issue brief explores these forces and the role that immigration could play in supporting future U.S. economic growth. It also examines how immigration affects workers already in the country, both native born and immigrant.

Policy Briefs
August 2019

In the coming decades, the U.S. labor market will undergo major transformation. Automation, an aging workforce, and alternative staffing practices will change how, where, and by whom work is done. This think piece, by a former chief economist for the U.S. Labor Department, explores how immigrant workers fit into this changing landscape, and what immigration and workforce policy changes could help maximize their contributions to the U.S. economy.

Reports
July 2019

As technological developments—from automation to artificial intelligence and machine learning—reshape the world of work, governments face the challenge of updating how they attract, select, and retain economic-stream immigrants. This report, concluding a series on building migration systems for a new age of economic competitiveness, lays out the key considerations for "future-proofing" immigrant selection systems.

Video, Audio
May 17, 2019

With the U.S. administration calling for the United States to adopt a more “merit-based” immigrant selection system, this conversation focused on what policymakers should consider in designing—and managing—immigrant selection systems in a time of intense labor-market and demographic change.

Reports
April 2019

National systems for selecting skilled foreign workers have evolved in two directions: Points-based systems in which governments select economic immigrants based on labor and human-capital considerations and demand-driven ones that rely heavily on employer involvement. This report explores these two models—and their convergence—and offers tips for designing selection systems that are flexible, transparent, and effective.

Video, Audio, Webinars
March 8, 2019

This webinar discusses the first-ever profile of the 30 million immigrant-origin adults in the United States who lack a postsecondary credential and offers analysis of the significant payoff credentials could bring in terms of workforce participation and wages.

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