E.g., 04/25/2024
E.g., 04/25/2024
Global Skills and Talent Initiative

Global Skills and Talent Initiative

Economic shifts, demographic pressures, technological advances, and difficulties recruiting and retaining workers during the COVID-19 pandemic are buffeting labor markets in rapid and at times unpredictable ways and contributing to growing labor shortages. This, in turn, has fueled discussions about the potential role for immigration.

MPI’s Global Skills and Talent Initiative explores the role immigration can play in addressing current and future workforce needs in rapidly evolving labor markets, with a particular focus on employment-based immigration and the supports that can help immigrants apply their full range of educational and professional skills. MPI’s premise is that decisions about immigration policy need to form part of a broader strategy on skills and talent that takes into account economic, social, and national interest considerations and can bring together government, private-sector, and civil-society viewpoints.

The Initiative’s work aims to answer five animating questions:

  • What role can immigration and immigrant integration play in meeting labor market needs?
  • How can immigration support competitiveness in high-growth sectors?
  • What does the future hold for low-wage immigration?
  • How can governments support and promote immigrant entrepreneurship and innovation?
  • What are the implications of remote work for immigration systems?

Over the last two decades, MPI has produced essential original research and insights on U.S. and global immigration selection systems, recruitment policies, credential recognition, immigrant integration, immigrant contributions to the economy, and workforce development for first- and second-generation immigrants. The work collected here showcases research produced for the Initiative and curates some of the most on-point work that MPI has done over the years with regards to 1) human capital and skills; 2) immigrant selection systems; 3) labor market integration; 4) the future of work; 5) migration partnerships; and 6) harnessing the benefits of immigration.

Recent Activity

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Coverthumb Jobsin2028
Reports
October 2018
By  Meghan Benton and Liam Patuzzi
Coverthumb GlobalCompact SkillPartnerships
Policy Briefs
September 2018
By  Kate Hooper
coverthumb IntegratingForeignTrainedProfessionals
Reports
February 2017
By  Margie McHugh and Madeleine Morawski
coverthumb adbbrainnetworks
Reports
February 2017
By  Jeanne Batalova, Andriy Shymonyak and Guntur Sugiyarto
coverthumb Bloomberg BrainWaste
Reports
December 2016
By  Jeanne Batalova, Michael Fix and James D. Bachmeier

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Recent Activity

Reports
August 2021

Even as COVID-19 vaccination campaigns have picked up speed in Europe, economic uncertainty remains. Recently arrived refugees, migrant women, and other immigrants who faced labor market challenges before the pandemic have in many cases seen these challenges grow. This report explores the impact of the public-health crisis on migrants’ labor market integration and options for building inclusive pandemic recovery strategies.

Audio, Webinars
June 24, 2021

During this webcast, experts discuss findings from a report examining at U.S. and state levels the underemployment of college graduates by nativity and by race and ethnicity, in the process revealing patterns of economic inequality. The conversation includes immigrant and employer voices who explore the promising strategies that exist to mitigate this brain waste for the benefit of the U.S. economy, local communities, and the workers themselves.

Commentaries
June 2021

The European Commission marks a new chapter in EU cooperation on migration with third countries with the launch of its Talent Partnerships, which seek to combine mobility schemes for work or training with investments in third countries in related areas, such as vocational education and training. The success of these partnerships will hinge on the degree of support they can win from Member States, the private sector, and third countries.

Reports
June 2021

While the educational credentials of recent immigrants to the United States have steadily risen, licensing and other barriers continue to prevent many college-educated immigrants from working at their skill level. This underutilization is particularly acute for Black and Latino college graduates, even after controlling for sociodemographic and educational characteristics. This report offers a U.S. and state profile of underemployment, and possible policy remedies.

Policy Briefs
May 2021

The U.S. legal immigration system, last significantly updated by Congress in 1990, is profoundly misaligned with demographic and other realities—resulting in enormous consequences for the country and for its economy. This road map sketches the broad contours of some of the most needed reforms in the legal immigration system, made all the more urgent by U.S. population aging and changing labor market demands.

Video, Audio, Webinars
November 9, 2020

MPI and OECD experts discuss the impact of the coronavirus on migration and mobility systems, findings from OECD’s International Migration Outlook 2020, opportunities for innovation, what labor demands may emerge, and the role of migration in North America and Europe at this challenging point in history.

Reports
October 2020

Immigrants and their U.S.-born children are key drivers of U.S. labor force growth. As some occupations grow and others decline, this report explores how these immigrant-origin workers fit within the changing world of work. It examines the degree to which workers from different racial/ethnic groups hold growing and declining jobs, and what changes in the mix of jobs mean for workforce development and immigration policy.

Commentaries
April 2020

In a time of critical shortages of U.S. health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, retired doctors are being called back to work and medical students are graduating on a fast track. There is another important pool that could be tapped: Immigrants and refugees who have college degrees in health fields but are working in low-skilled jobs or out of work. MPI estimates 263,000 immigrants are experiencing skill underutilization and could be a valuable resource.

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