E.g., 09/18/2019
E.g., 09/18/2019

State Demographics Data - NC; http:

Demographics & Social
2017
2017
2017
 
Foreign Born
Foreign Born
Foreign Born
 
Foreign Born
Foreign Born
Foreign Born
 
Population
Population
Population

Sources: Migration Policy Institute tabulations of the U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey (ACS) and Decennial Census. Unless stated otherwise, 2017 data are from the one-year ACS file. For information about ACS definitions, methodology, sampling error, and nonsampling error, click here. Estimates from 1990 and 2000 Decennial Census data as well as ACS microdata are from Steven Ruggles, Sarah Flood, Ronald Goeken, Josiah Grover, Erin Meyer, Jose Pacas, and Matthew Sobek. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) USA: Version 8.0 [dataset]. Minneapolis, MN: IPUMS, 2018. https://doi.org/10.18128/D010.V8.0.

Definitions

  • The term "foreign born" refers to people residing in the United States at the time of the population survey who were not U.S. citizens at birth. The foreign-born population includes naturalized U.S. citizens, lawful permanent immigrants (or green-card holders), refugees and asylees, certain legal nonimmigrants (including those on student, work, or some other temporary visas), and persons residing in the country without authorization.
  • The term "U.S. born" refers to people residing in the United States who were U.S. citizens in one of three categories: people born in one of the 50 states or the District of Columbia; people born in U.S. Insular Areas such as Puerto Rico or Guam; or people who were born abroad to at least one U.S. citizen parent.
  • The term "low-income families" refers to families with annual incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty threshold.

Data-related notes

  • The letter N indicates that an estimate could not be provided by the Census Bureau because the number of sample cases was too small for this state.
  • For “Median Age” and “Household Size”: Data for Alaska, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wyoming are from the U.S. Census Bureau's pooled 2013-2017 American Community Survey (ACS). Data for the United States overall and for the remaining states are from the 2017 ACS.
  • Region of birth: For 1990, 2000, and current ACS year, the total for the region of birth of the foreign born is different from the total foreign born. This is because the 1990 total excludes those who did not report a country of birth and those born at sea, while the 2000 census and the current ACS year totals exclude those born at sea.
  • Countries of birth: These are the largest countries of birth reported by the Census Bureau. Some countries are only listed as part of a larger geographic region. For example, those born in Somalia are included only among those born in Eastern Africa. Therefore, a few states may have larger populations of foreign-born persons born in countries not listed individually in census data. For each of the three years, countries of birth reflect geographic boundaries as of that year.
  • Beginning with the 2014 ACS, the Census Bureau is excluding children of same-sex married couples from the total number of children. This means that the total number of children may be smaller than in previous years.
  • Children of immigrants: Refers only to children under age 18 who resided with at least one parent. These figures do not include children under age 18 who reside in a home with no parents.