E.g., 02/18/2019
E.g., 02/18/2019

Miryam Hazán

MPI Authors

Miryam Hazán

Miryam Hazán is a migration specialist at the Organization of American States. Previously, she was a senior consultant with the Inter-American Development Bank where she led a major research project on international migration in Central America, Mexico, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic. Dr. Hazán is also a senior fellow with the Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University, and she has held research and scholarly positions at Demos, Ideas in Action, the Migration Policy Institute, the University of Pennsylvania, Rutgers University, and the Tomas Rivera Policy Institute at the University of Texas, Austin.

Dr. Hazán holds a PhD in government from the University of Texas, Austin; an MA in Latin American studies from Georgetown University; and a BA in journalism and mass media from the Autonomous University of Mexico. She is the author of numerous policy reports, journal articles, book chapters, and blogs on topics related to international migration and refugees in the Americas, migration and development, immigrant integration in the United States, Latino politics, and U.S.-Mexico relations.

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Policy Briefs
January 2019
By Andrew Selee, Jessica Bolter, Betilde Muñoz-Pogossian, and Miryam Hazán
Policy Briefs
January 2019
By Andrew Selee, Jessica Bolter, Betilde Muñoz-Pogossian, and Miryam Hazán

Recent Activity

Policy Briefs
January 2019

Enfrentados con la llegada de más de 3 millones de venezolanos huyendo de una economía colapsada y conflictos políticos, los países latinoamericanos han respondido con creatividad y pragmatismo. Pero, a medida que la crisis venezolana y la migración que ha impulsado se extienden, es necesario examinar más allá de la facilitación de la entrada legal y la otorgación del estatus temporal para planificar a largo plazo.

Policy Briefs
January 2019

Faced with the arrival of more than 3 million Venezuelans fleeing economic collapse and political upheaval, Latin American countries have responded with creativity and pragmatism. But as the migration spurred by the crisis stretches on, there is a need to look beyond facilitating legal entry and granting temporary status to plan for the long term. This brief explores the policy response thus far and challenges ahead.