E.g., 06/27/2024
E.g., 06/27/2024
Luisa Feline Freier
Experts & Staff
Luisa Feline Freier photo 2020 cropped 4

Luisa Feline Freier

Nonresident Fellow
Associate Professor, Universidad del Pacifico

Luisa Feline Freier is an Associate Professor of political science at the Universidad del Pacífico in Lima, Peru. Her research focuses on migration and refugee policies and laws in Latin America, south-south migration, and the Venezuelan displacement crisis.

She has provided consultation services to various international institutions and organizations such as Amnesty International, the European Union, the Inter-American Development Bank, the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and the World Bank. She is an IOM Migration Research and Publishing High-Level Adviser. 

Professor Freier has been a Fellow of the Fulbright program, the Naumann Foundation for Freedom, and the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). She is an affiliate of the Refugee Law Initiative of the University of London.  

She holds a Ph.D. in political science from the London School of Economics, a master's degree in Latin American and Caribbean studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a bachelor's in economics from the Universität zu Köln in Germany. 

 

Bio Page Tabs

Cover image for Converging Crises
Reports
March 2024
By  Luisa Feline Freier, Andrea Kvietok and Leon Lucar Oba
Cover image for Expanding Protection Options?
Reports
January 2024
By  Andrew Selee, Susan Fratzke, Samuel Davidoff-Gore and Luisa Feline Freier

Recent Activity

Reports
March 2024

The COVID-19 pandemic hit South American nations at a time when many were already contending with major migration challenges. Historic levels of intraregional migration and displacement, notably from Venezuela, collided with countries’ attempts to stop the spread of a new threat to public health. This report examines the region’s responses to the public-health crisis, and the immediate and lasting impacts on cross-border movement.

Reports
January 2024

The massive and rapid displacement of Syrians, Venezuelans, and Ukrainians presented neighboring countries with an impossible task: providing legal status and assistance, even though their asylum systems lacked the capacity to handle such a large influx. This report examines the costs and benefits of the flexible approaches taken to providing status in these three cases, identifying lessons for future crises.