E.g., 06/14/2021
E.g., 06/14/2021
Julian Hattem
Experts & Staff
Hattem

Julian Hattem

Editor, Migration Information Source

202 266 1906

Julian Hattem is Editor of the Migration Information Source, the online journal of the Migration Policy Institute, and is responsible for its content and publication.

Before joining MPI, he spent a decade as a journalist focusing on international migration, politics, and conflict. He has been on staff with the Associated Press, The Hill, and the Yomiuri Shimbun, and has been awarded journalism fellowships from the Heinrich Boell Foundation North America and the International Reporting Project to report on migration in Southern Europe and Southeast Asia. As a freelance journalist he reported from four continents, and his articles have been published by outlets including the Guardian, the Washington Post, Public Radio International, World Politics Review, National Public Radio, and Quartz.

Mr. Hattem holds a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from the University of Chicago and a master’s degree in conflict studies from the London School of Economics.

Bio Page Tabs

cccm-ep6-mcleman
Expert Q&A, Audio
February 5, 2021

Climate change is already affecting how, whether, and where people migrate. But environmental change is likely to become more extreme in the coming decades, unless the world takes serious action now. How might changes made now impact what future migration looks like?

cccm-ep5-megan-carney
Expert Q&A, Audio
January 12, 2021

Reliable access to food—or lack thereof—can affect an individual’s decision to migrate. Climate change has the ability to exacerbate food insecurity, especially for farmers and others who live off the land, which can have repercussions for human mobility.

cccm-ep4-timo-schmidt
Expert Q&A, Audio
December 30, 2020

Billions of dollars are being spent on projects to help communities mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change, including those at risk of being displaced by environmental events. This episode features Timo Schmidt, from MPI Europe, in a discussion about the growing field of climate finance and its implications for migration management and displacement prevention.

cccm episode_3 title for web
Expert Q&A, Audio
December 16, 2020

Confronting environmental change, whole communities sometimes relocate from one area to another. This purposeful, coordinated movement, while currently rare, is referred to as managed retreat. In this episode Architesh Panda, from the London School of Economics’ Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, explains how this climate adaptation strategy works in India.

CCCM EpisodeTile 2v2
Expert Q&A, Audio
November 25, 2020

There are a lot of predictions about how many people will migrate in response to climate change. Depending on where you look, the next few decades could see hundreds of millions – or even more than a billion – people pick up and move. We asked Julia Blocher, of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, to explain why the predictions vary so much.

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Recent Activity

Expert Q&A, Audio
December 16, 2020

Confronting environmental change, whole communities sometimes relocate from one area to another. This purposeful, coordinated movement, while currently rare, is referred to as managed retreat. In this episode Architesh Panda, from the London School of Economics’ Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, explains how this climate adaptation strategy works in India.

Expert Q&A, Audio
November 25, 2020

There are a lot of predictions about how many people will migrate in response to climate change. Depending on where you look, the next few decades could see hundreds of millions – or even more than a billion – people pick up and move. We asked Julia Blocher, of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, to explain why the predictions vary so much. We also discussed how this movement can lead to conflict.

Expert Q&A, Audio
November 17, 2020

The relationship between climate change and migration is long and complex. Human civilizations have been affected by environmental conditions for centuries, but we should be wary of arguments that huge numbers of people are inevitably destined to migrate in response to specific climate threats. In this episode of Changing Climate, Changing Migration, we chat with Alex de Sherbinin of Columbia University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network about what the research shows—and does not show.

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