E.g., 10/27/2021
E.g., 10/27/2021
Dovelyn Rannveig Mendoza
MPI Authors

Dovelyn Rannveig Mendoza

Dovelyn Rannveig Mendoza was a Senior Policy Analyst at the Migration Policy Institute, where she managed MPI’s work in the Asia-Pacific region. Her areas of expertise include temporary and circular migration, particularly between Asia and the Middle East; diaspora policy; and the migration-development nexus.  

Before joining MPI, Ms. Mendoza was an Edward Weintal Scholar at the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy in Washington, DC and a factory worker and part-time domestic worker in Reykjavik, Iceland. She also worked as Regional Research Officer at the International Organization for Migration in Bangkok and as consultant at the World Bank in Washington, DC and in Sydney.

She holds a master’s degree in foreign service, with honors, from Georgetown University, where she concentrated in international development; and a bachelor’s degree in political science, cum laude, from the University of the Philippines.

Read Ms. Mendoza's report, Guiding the Invisible Hand: Making Migration Intermediaries Work for Development.

Bio Page Tabs

Qatar's dependence on foreign workers is expected to intensify over the coming decade as it steps up its preparations to host the World Cup in 2022. Migrant workers already dominate Qatar's labor force, comprising 94 percent of all workers and 86 percent of the country's total population of nearly 2 million — the world's highest ratio of migrants to citizens.

For many developing countries, migrants are considered valuable contributors to future development. As proof of their commitment, they have invested in diaspora institutions with responsibilities ranging from protecting migrants to encouraging investment. MPI's Dovelyn Rannveig Agunias analyzes 45 such institutions across 30 countries and breaks them down by type.

Temporary workers, generally seen as a solution to the changing and growing economic needs of developed countries, rarely focus on the needs of migrant-sending countries. MPI's Dovelyn Agunias reviews relevant research and the policy options proposed for closing this gap.

In 2004, Central American countries received US$ 7.8 billion in remittances through official channels. Are remittances hurting or helping the region? MPI’s Dovelyn Agunias investigates.

Recent Activity

Policy Briefs
September 2008

This report provides a global look at circular migration experiences, depicts various governments’ attempts at creating circular migration, evaluates the economic costs and benefits of circular migration for sending and receiving countries, identifies components of effective bilateral agreements, and reviews outcomes governments might realistically expect from their circular migration policies.

Policy Briefs
September 2007
This report investigates how migrant-sending countries can protect their migrant workers abroad by examining the policies, functions, and challenges of the Philippine government’s membership-driven welfare fund, the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA).
Policy Briefs
April 2007

This report draws from the existing body of knowledge surrounding circular migration to identify: research gaps, shortcomings of common policy routes, innovative circular migration policies, and critical considerations for policymakers seeking to design and implement positive circular migration schemes.

Articles

Temporary workers, generally seen as a solution to the changing and growing economic needs of developed countries, rarely focus on the needs of migrant-sending countries. MPI's Dovelyn Agunias reviews relevant research and the policy options proposed for closing this gap.

Reports
September 2006

For an increasing number of scholars, international migration has undergone a transformation particularly in the last decade or so. Although circular migration’s impact on development is far from settled, a review of the current literature suggests increasing optimism about its developmental potential.

Reports
September 2006

Previously confined to everyday conversations among migrants and their families, remittances are now on the minds of most governments, members of civil society, the international community, and, to some extent, the private sector. The continued deficiency in our understanding of some of the fundamental aspects of remittances is evident in current literature.

Articles

In 2004, Central American countries received US$ 7.8 billion in remittances through official channels. Are remittances hurting or helping the region? MPI’s Dovelyn Agunias investigates.

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