E.g., 08/10/2022
E.g., 08/10/2022
Ana Martín Gil
MPI Authors

Ana Martín Gil

Ana Martín Gil is a former Research Intern with the Latin America and Caribbean Initiative at MPI. Her research focuses on migration governance and refugee issues in Mexico, Central America, and the Middle East. She works as a Program Coordinator for the Center for the Middle East at the Baker Institute for Public Policy. Previously, she was a Research Assistant at the Baker Institute for Public Policy and Head of the Visa Department at the Consulate General of Spain in Houston.

Ms. Martín Gil holds a master’s degree in global affairs from Rice University, with a concentration in international political development, and a bachelor’s degree in translation and interpretation from Universidad Pontificia Comillas.

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Cover image for Programas de trabajadores temporales en Canadá, México y Costa Rica
Reports
June 2022
By  Cristobal Ramón, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, María Jesús Mora and Ana Martín Gil
Cover image for Temporary Worker Programs in Canada, Mexico, and Costa Rica
Reports
June 2022
By  Cristobal Ramón, Ariel G. Ruiz Soto, María Jesús Mora and Ana Martín Gil

Recent Activity

Reports
June 2022

La migración irregular desde El Salvador, Guatemala y Honduras se ha convertido en una de las principales características del panorama migratorio en Centroamérica y Norteamérica, pero existen pocas vías legales para los centroamericanos que se ven presionados a emigrar. Este informe explora cómo Canadá, México y Costa Rica podrían utilizar los programas de trabajo temporal existentes para ampliar las opciones de migración legal.

Reports
June 2022

Irregular migration from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras has become a dominant feature of the migration landscape in Central and North America, yet few legal pathways exist for Central Americans facing pressure to emigrate. This report explores how Canada, Mexico, and Costa Rica could use existing temporary worker programs to expand legal migration options while also helping fill their labor shortages.