E.g., 02/06/2016
E.g., 02/06/2016

U.S. Immigrant Population Spotlights

U.S. Immigrant Population Spotlights

These demographic profiles from MPI's online journal, the Migration Information Source, use the most current data available to examine immigrant populations in the United States by country of origin or by other characteristic, such as age, legal status, education, or type of employment. Learn more about immigrants from Mexico, China, India, the Philippines, and many other countries and regions, including population size, recency of arrival, places of settlement, educational attainment, modes of entry, legal status, and more.

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The number of college-educated immigrants in the United States has more than tripled in the last two decades. Asians accounted for 46 percent of the 10.5 million college-educated immigrants, with India the top origin country. This Spotlight article examines key indicators of the college-educated population, including international students and high-skilled H-1B visa holders.

Online Journal

The number of Asian immigrants in the United States has increased exponentially over the last 50 years, and Asia is now the second-largest region of birth of U.S. immigrants. The growth of this population dates to the abolition in 1965 of national-origin quotas that barred immigration from Asia. This article delves into key data on Asian immigrants, from settlement and employment patterns to immigration pathways, and more.

Online Journal

European migration, once the driving force of U.S. immigration, has steadily declined over the last 50 years. In 2014, 4.8 million European immigrants accounted for 11 percent of the total foreign-born population, down from 75 percent in 1960. Discover key statistics on this population in this Spotlight article, including countries of origin, language proficiency, employment, and more.

Online Journal

The United States is the largest refugee resettlement country in the world, with 69,933 newly arrived refugees granted protection in 2015. Responding to the global humanitarian crisis, the Obama administration has proposed increasing the number of refugees the United States accepts annually to 100,000 in 2017. This article delves into the most recent refugee and asylum data in the United States, including top countries of origin, states of settlement, and more.

Online Journal

The annual inflow of new lawful permanent residents (LPRs), also known as green-card holders, has ebbed and flowed with changes in U.S. immigration policy and processing backlogs. This data Spotlight delves into legal immigration in the United States, covering class of admission, country of origin, destination states, and more.

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