E.g., 11/28/2014
E.g., 11/28/2014

Recession & Employment

Recession & Employment

The global economic crisis hit migrants and their financial well-being particularly hard, in some countries opening a wider gap in employment rates between foreign-born and native-born workers. The research offered here examines how immigrants fare in changing labor markets, the effects of the most severe economic crisis in decades on immigrant employment and migration patterns, and policymaking as it relates to adjusting immigration levels and opening or narrowing labor markets for foreign-born workers.

Recent Activity

Pages

Reports
May 2011
By Aaron Terrazas, Demetrios G. Papademetriou, and Marc R. Rosenblum
Reports
March 2011
By Elizabeth Collett
Reports
October 2010
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Madeleine Sumption, and Aaron Terrazas
Reports
September 2010
By Randy Capps and Michael Fix
Reports
May 2010
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou and Annette Heuser
Reports
November 2009
By Pia M. Orrenius and Madeline Zavodny

Pages

Recent Activity

Books
March, 2013

This volume, which brings together research by leading economists and labor market specialists, examines the role immigrants play in the U.S. workforce, how they fare in good and bad economic times, and the effects they have on native-born workers and the labor sectors in which they are engaged. The book traces the powerful economic forces at play in today’s globalized world and includes policy prescriptions for making the American immigration system more responsive to labor market needs.

Reports
February 2013

While free movement is at the heart of the European project, the merits and impacts of intra-EU mobility have come under significant scrutiny recently amid public anxiety about competition for jobs and exploitation of welfare systems. This report provides a detailed assessment of free movement, motivations for migration, and challenges countries may need to address as intra-EU mobility enters its next phase. 

Audio
October 24, 2012

How the anti-immigrant political movement and rancorous debates surrounding immigration will impact countries’ ability to build strong economies and vibrant, diverse societies is yet to be determined. This discussion focuses on the factors and players that contribute to this environment, an analysis on the current situation in both Europe and the United States, and a discussion on its implications for community cohesion and national identity in European countries and the United States.

Reports
May 2012

This report focuses on the effects of migration on political extremism in North America, Western Europe, and Central and Eastern Europe. The author explores nativist reactions, analyzes the role of migration in the identity and discourse of nativist actors, examines public effects of their impact on migration policies, and summarizes ways in which states respond to anti-immigrant extremism.

Reports
February 2012

This Transatlantic Council Statement examines both the challenge and opportunity for governments, in an era of skepticism about migration, to create a new definition of “we” based on a more inclusive idea of national identity and belonging, and to convince the broader society that investing in integration is an investment in shared futures.

Reports
February 2012

The two sides of the debate on immigration and integration in Europe share an underlying assumption that the problem is cultural, while disagreeing on whether it is the result of too much or too little respect for cultural differences. This report contends that both get the issue wrong, calling attention to the inability of policies to ensure immigrants acquire and retain work.

Video, Audio
December 7, 2011

A discussion on the gains that young adult immigrants or the U.S.-born children of immigrants have made in education and employment, with speakers: Michael Fix, Jeanne Batalova, Andrew P. Kelly, Raul Gonzalez, and Margie McHugh.

Reports
November 2011

The story of immigrant integration in the United States has historically been one of generational progress, with the gains for second-generation Hispanic women particularly impressive, as this report reveals. It profiles first- and second-generation young adults ages 16 to 26, examining this diverse population's education and career pathways.

Pages