E.g., 11/28/2014
E.g., 11/28/2014

Employment Verification

Employment Verification

Verification of an employee's authorization to work has been a tenet of U.S. immigration policy since 1986, when Congress first required employers to verify the identity and employment eligibility of their workers. This less-known pillar of immigration enforcement, designed to address the jobs magnet that draws workers into the country illegally,  is receiving new attention as the federal government continues to refine and expand its electronic employment eligibility verification system, known as E-Verify. The research here examines issues associated with electronic employment verification and challenges in developing an effective system.

Recent Activity

Policy Briefs
October 2007
By Claire Bergeron , Aaron Terrazas, and Doris Meissner
Reports
September 2006
By Doris Meissner, Deborah W. Meyers, Demetrios G. Papademetriou, and Michael Fix
Policy Briefs
July 2006
By David A. Martin
Online Journal
Policy Briefs
November 2005
By Kevin Jernegan
Policy Briefs
November 2005
By Marc R. Rosenblum

Pages

Recent Activity

Fact Sheets
June 2007

This fact sheet compiles, in an easily comprehendible table, the security features of documents currently used by U.S. residents, including passports, Social Security cards, permanent residence cards, employment authorization cards, and state driver’s licenses.

Reports
September 2006

The culminating report of the Independent Task Force on Immigration and America’s Future seeks to design a new and simplified immigration regime that averts illegal immigration, and at the same time, harnesses the benefits of immigration for the future.

Policy Briefs
July 2006

New immigration legislation must include changes to achieve effective and resolute enforcement of the immigration laws. Because border and workplace enforcement have been addressed elsewhere, this policy brief offers suggestions for other key enforcement improvements that Congress should implement.

Policy Briefs
November 2005

This policy brief examines the flaws in the United States’ existing employer sanctions regime and proposes six types of reform that could strengthen the system: improvements to document security, document consolidation, mandatory use of employment databases, increased enforcement staffing, a revised penalty structure, and better worksite access for investigators.

Policy Briefs
November 2005

This report explores the successes and failures of various attempts to create an employment verification system that reliably establishes an employee’s eligibility to work since the passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act in 1986. Through this analysis, the author evaluates the effectiveness and potential contributions of the current system and seeks to inform proposals for future initiatives.

Policy Briefs
November 2005

This brief provides a historical overview of various attempts at implementing workplace enforcement in the United States before arguing in favor of a process not unlike credit-card verification that allows employers to swipe a card at the point of hire and receive a response in real time from the Social Security Administration informing them whether an employee is authorized to work in the United States.

Policy Briefs
August 2005

The 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) was the first legislative attempt to comprehensively address the issue of unauthorized immigration. The bill included sanctions against employers for the hiring of undocumented migrants, more robust border enforcement, and an expansive legalization program that was unprecedented.

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