E.g., 04/26/2015
E.g., 04/26/2015

Deportations/Removals

Deportations/Removals

A sharp rise in removals of unauthorized immigrants has taken place in the United States since 1990—rising from approximately 30,000 to nearly 400,000 annually today. The groundwork for this level of removals, as described in the research below, occurred over many years, with increased funding for additional manpower and detention capacity, expanded use of administrative (versus judicial) orders to effect removals, and an increase in the types of violations for which noncitizens can be removed.

Recent Activity

Reports
January 2013
By Doris Meissner, Donald M. Kerwin, Muzaffar Chishti, and Claire Bergeron
Reports
July 2012
By Michael Jones-Correa
Reports
December 2011
By Christal Morehouse and Michael Blomfield
Fact Sheets
August 2011
By Michelle Mittelstadt, Burke Speaker, Doris Meissner, and Muzaffar Chishti
Reports
August 2011
By Marc R. Rosenblum and Kate Brick

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Recent Activity

Reports
March 2010

This report provides an analytical framework for determining whether the 287(g) program is worth maintaining, and offers recommendations on how federal and local officials can shape the program to promote efficiency, accountability, and basic human rights, and to assist community leaders in monitoring the program.

Video
September 10, 2009

A panel discussion exploring whether ICE is capable of meeting legal standards and manage its detention system with ICE's Dora Schriro, Detention Watch Network's Andrea Black, and MPI expert Donald Kerwin.

Reports
September 2009

This report explores whether U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is capable of fully complying with the law and managing its sprawling detention system, and provides a roadmap for meeting the data needs essential for making humane, cost-effective, and legally sound decisions related to those in custody.

Reports
February 2009

This report assesses the performance of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) over the course of the agency’s first six years, examines the effectiveness of the three core immigration agencies within DHS—U.S Customs and Border Protection, U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement, and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Reports
February 2009

This report argues that U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement’s National Fugitive Operations Program is not operating in accordance with its legislative purpose of improving national security by apprehending dangerous individuals with existing removal orders.

Fact Sheets
November 2005

This report closely examines the rapid growth of government appropriations directly targeted to immigration enforcement activities since the passage of the Immigration Control and Reform Act of 1986 (IRCA). Focusing primarily on data between 1985 and 2002, authors highlight trends in the overall immigration enforcement spending as well as in specific activities.

Policy Briefs
April 2005

Although federal statute affords “the privilege of being represented,” to immigrants in removal proceedings, appointed counsel must be “at no expense to the government.” This report analyzes the “no expense” restriction and its effect on case outcomes. It then outlines a number of ways in which legal representation could be increased without significant federal funding.

Reports
March 2004

This report examines the transfer of immigration functions from the former Immigration and Naturalization Service to the newly established Department of Homeland Security and offers an analysis of the Department’s progress in its first year of existence toward accomplishing the two purposes for which it was created: (1) to ensure that immigration regulation and control enhances national security; and (2) to improve the performance of both the service and enforcement sides of the immigration system by allocating their respective functions to separate units within DHS. 

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