E.g., 09/18/2014
E.g., 09/18/2014

Deportations/Removals

Deportations/Removals

A sharp rise in removals of unauthorized immigrants has taken place in the United States since 1990—rising from approximately 30,000 to nearly 400,000 annually today. The groundwork for this level of removals, as described in the research below, occurred over many years, with increased funding for additional manpower and detention capacity, expanded use of administrative (versus judicial) orders to effect removals, and an increase in the types of violations for which noncitizens can be removed.

Recent Activity

Reports
February 2009
By Michael Wishnie, Margot Mendelson , and Shayna Strom
Reports
February 2009
By Doris Meissner and Donald M. Kerwin
Online Journal
Fact Sheets
November 2005
By David Dixon and Julia Gelatt
Policy Briefs
April 2005
By Donald M. Kerwin

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Recent Activity

Reports
March 2004

This report examines the transfer of immigration functions from the former Immigration and Naturalization Service to the newly established Department of Homeland Security and offers an analysis of the Department’s progress in its first year of existence toward accomplishing the two purposes for which it was created: (1) to ensure that immigration regulation and control enhances national security; and (2) to improve the performance of both the service and enforcement sides of the immigration system by allocating their respective functions to separate units within DHS. 

Policy Briefs
June 2003

The events that unfolded in the U.S. on September 11 generated a renewed sense of urgency over border management. Bilateral Smart Border agreements were reached between the U.S. and Canada as well as the U.S. and Mexico in December 2001 and March 2002. This report tracks the implementation of these border accords and seeks to evaluate their effectiveness.

Policy Briefs
April 2003

On November 25, 2002, Congress passed the Homeland Security Act, which effectively overhauled the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and called for a massive reorganization of immigration functions under the newly formed Department of Homeland Security (DHS).This report outlines key changes incurred, highlights points of concern and offers policy recommendations aimed at remedying some of these concerns.

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