E.g., 08/27/2014
E.g., 08/27/2014

Civil Liberties

Civil Liberties

In the post-9/11 era, immigration policy increasingly has intersected with civil liberties and national security imperatives, with significant implications for law enforcement and intelligence agencies as they share more information with each other and with allied governments as well as for immigrants and immigrant communities. The research here examines the increased use of interoperable databases, expanded international information-sharing partnerships, and the civil liberties implications of the increased nexus between immigration enforcement agencies and those in the criminal law enforcement and intelligence communities.

Recent Activity

Fact Sheets
February 2008
By Claire Bergeron
Reports
December 2007
By Cristina Rodríguez , Muzaffar Chishti, and Kimberly Nortman
Online Journal
Online Journal
Policy Briefs
November 2005
By Kevin Jernegan
Online Journal
Online Journal

Pages

Recent Activity

Reports
December 2005

Since the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the United States Department of Justice has sought to engage local police in the systematic enforcement of routine civil immigration violations, marking a sea change in immigration and local law enforcement practices. This report provides the first public glimpse of how the new NCIC policy has affected on‐the‐ ground policing strategies across the country and which immigrant groups have been most heavily impacted.

Policy Briefs
November 2005

This report examines the sweeping changes in the way identity documents are issued and used under the REAL ID Act, an effort to enhance the security of identity documents in post-9/11 America. It takes a detailed look at how this legislation will affect document issuing agencies, state budgets, and the employment verification system, in addition to immigrants and citizens.

Policy Briefs
June 2003

The events that unfolded in the U.S. on September 11 generated a renewed sense of urgency over border management. Bilateral Smart Border agreements were reached between the U.S. and Canada as well as the U.S. and Mexico in December 2001 and March 2002. This report tracks the implementation of these border accords and seeks to evaluate their effectiveness.

Reports
March 2003

The September 11 attacks demanded a powerful response, but blanket measures such as roundups and arrests, intimidating interviews, lengthy detention, and special registration requirements are blunt tools.This report offers the most comprehensive compilation and analysis yet of the individuals detained in the wake of September 11, their experiences, and the government’s post-September 11 immigration measures.

Books
May, 2002

In countries that experience large influxes of immigrants, citizenship laws can offer an effective tool for promoting inclusion and integration.This book offers a set of detailed policy proposals on four aspects of citizenship policy: access to citizenship, managing dual nationality, political integration, and social and economic rights.

Policy Briefs
September 2001

In the immediate aftermath of September 11, the U.S. government committed to increasing national security through every possible avenue. Although the most effective measures to combat terrorism will inevitably rely on intelligence, certain immigration programs and procedures can contribute to better intelligence and enhanced security.

Pages