E.g., 08/29/2016
E.g., 08/29/2016

Migration Policy Institute - No name

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Post date: Fri, 26 Aug 2016 12:28:25 -0400

This webinar explores the key education funding mechanisms in place to support English Learner elementary and secondary students in the United States, public conversations about funding, and efforts to improve the equitable distribution of educational resources.

Post date: Wed, 24 Aug 2016 14:44:01 -0400

WASHINGTON – With nearly 10 percent of U.S. elementary and secondary students less than fully fluent in English, many school districts are struggling to develop the capacity to meet the needs of children from immigrant and refugee backgrounds. A new report from the Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy examines the diverse approaches taken at federal, state and local levels to provide appropriate funding for the education of nearly 5 million English Learner (EL) students—most of whom are U.S. born.

Post date: Tue, 23 Aug 2016 12:16:04 -0400

In contrast to increasingly restrictive approaches to migration in the global North—and recent skepticism towards Europe's free mobility project—South America is taking steps in the other direction, toward free movement for regional migrants. This article examines the emerging South American model and discusses its implications for migration in the region and for free movement in general.

Post date: Mon, 22 Aug 2016 09:52:45 -0400

With English Learners (ELs) representing nearly 10 percent of U.S. elementary and secondary students, many school districts are struggling to develop the capacity to meet the needs of children from immigrant and refugee backgrounds. This study provides an overview of supplementary funding mechanisms to improve EL outcomes, examining policies at state and local levels, and making recommendations for improvement.

Post date: Tue, 16 Aug 2016 10:20:10 -0400

Marking the release of an report, this webinar explores the key education funding mechanisms in place to support English Learners, public conversations about funding, and efforts to improve the equitable distribution of educational resources.

Post date: Mon, 15 Aug 2016 15:41:52 -0400

More than 100 Jamaicans are deported on average each month from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada, and are returned to a country grappling with high levels of crime and poverty. This article explores the constructive role that deported migrants, who are often socially stigmatized upon return, can play in rebuilding their lives while contributing to the larger project of national development in Jamaica.

Post date: Thu, 11 Aug 2016 18:40:16 -0400

Marking the fourth anniversary of the implementation of the DACA program, this webinar presents findings on the most current estimates of potential DACA beneficiaries, trends in requests and application rates, and discussion of recent policy and political developments.

Post date: Wed, 10 Aug 2016 14:11:55 -0400

WASHINGTON — Ninety-three percent of the unauthorized immigrants participating in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program who are eligible to apply for renewal have done so, the Migration Policy Institute (MPI) reports in a new issue brief that examines the deferred action program as its fourth anniversary nears.

Post date: Tue, 09 Aug 2016 13:57:43 -0400

More than 653,000 immigrants became U.S. citizens in fiscal year 2014, bringing the total number of naturalized U.S. citizens to 20 million—nearly half the overall immigrant population of 42.4 million. Over the past decade, naturalizations have ranged from about 537,000 yearly to just more than 1 million. Learn more about naturalization trends in the United States with this Spotlight article.

Post date: Mon, 08 Aug 2016 12:03:39 -0400

At the fourth anniversary of the Obama administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, this issue brief describes the populations eligible for DACA as of 2016; discusses recent policy developments; presents trends in DACA requests and application rates nationwide, by state, and for top countries of origin; and examines the impacts that DACA has had on qualifying young unauthorized immigrants.

Post date: Wed, 03 Aug 2016 13:56:53 -0400

Marking the fourth anniversary of the implementation of the DACA program, this webinar presents findings on the most current estimates of potential DACA beneficiaries, trends in requests and application rates, and discussion of recent policy and political developments. Experts also discuss how DACA has affected the integration of qualifying young unauthorized immigrants. 

Post date: Wed, 27 Jul 2016 16:40:33 -0400

The stark contrast between the Republican and Democratic parties on immigration was codified in their 2016 party platforms, and showcased in the rosters of convention speakers—featuring victims of unauthorized immigrant crimes on the one hand, and unauthorized immigrants living in fear on the other. This article explores the evidence, even compared to earlier platforms, of two divergent universes regarding immigration.

Post date: Thu, 21 Jul 2016 10:23:49 -0400

As many as half of all unauthorized immigrants in the United States entered legally and overstayed a visa. This article explores a possible way to refine visa policies: Examine the economic growth of travelers' home countries. The author examines the correlation between economic growth and the rate at which a country’s nationals are denied visas, and explores how this might inform visa policy.

Post date: Wed, 20 Jul 2016 11:36:58 -0400

With issues of immigration policy very much at the forefront of the upcoming elections, this annual conference will offer policy and legal analysis on key immigration topics facing the country and the incoming administration and Congress.

Post date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 16:25:34 -0400

The UK vote to exit the European Union has given new momentum to euroskeptic, anti-immigration movements elsewhere. Experts discuss the political and policy lessons that can be learned from Brexit and applied to debates in Europe and North America, including how to address public anxiety over immigration and identity while managing migration in a globalized economy.

Post date: Thu, 14 Jul 2016 08:55:12 -0400

WASHINGTON – Recent events in Europe and North America—the Brexit referendum on withdrawing the United Kingdom from the European Union, growing support for far-right parties across Europe and the stridency of the immigration debate occurring in the U.S. presidential campaign—reflect diminished public trust in government’s ability to manage migration well and to advantage.

Post date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 11:04:38 -0400

What factors are fueling rising public anxiety over immigration seen in Europe and North America? This Transatlantic Council report outlines and analyzes the factors that can set the stage for such public unease—some of which have their roots outside of immigration policy per se, and are instead deeply embedded in the global, national, and local contexts within which migration occurs—and offers policymakers strategies to respond.

Post date: Wed, 13 Jul 2016 08:42:52 -0400

The Brazilian immigrant population in the United States doubled during the 1980s and almost tripled in the 1990s, but stabilized following the Great Recession. While this population has long included a significant share of unauthorized immigrants, Brazilians are increasingly coming to the United States through family, employment, and study channels. Learn more about Brazilian immigrants with this Spotlight.

Post date: Thu, 07 Jul 2016 15:39:08 -0400

The UK vote to exit the European Union has given new momentum to euroskeptic, anti-immigration movements elsewhere. Experts discuss the political and policy lessons that can be learned from Brexit and applied to debates in Europe and North America, including how to address public anxiety over immigration and identity, while managing migration in a globalized economy.

Post date: Wed, 06 Jul 2016 12:57:26 -0400

Twenty-five years after enactment of the Immigration Act of 1990, the law remains the framework for the current U.S. legal immigration system. This issue brief examines the legislation, which sought to admit more immigrants based on their skills and education, finding it has only modestly increased the employment-based immigration share. The law also created the diversity visa program and Temporary Protected Status.