E.g., 03/22/2017
E.g., 03/22/2017

State Sociodemographic Portraits of Immigrant and U.S.-Born Parents of Young Children

Fact Sheets
December 2016

State Sociodemographic Portraits of Immigrant and U.S.-Born Parents of Young Children

These 30 fact sheets provide a sociodemographic sketch of foreign- and U.S.-born parents with young children (ages 0 to 8) in select U.S. states, based on analysis of U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey data. The fact sheets accompany a national report, Serving Immigrant Families Through Two-Generation Programs: Identifying Family Needs and Responsive Program Approaches, that examines the success of a select number of two-generation programs aimed at immigrant and refugee parents—who comprise almost one-quarter of all U.S. parents with young children.

Related Resources

Many states are working to build high-quality early childhood systems in order to better assure that all children can stay on track and reach their full potential as adults. At the same time they are implementing new federal laws—the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA)—that are meant to improve quality and equity in state education and workforce training systems. Given the extent of ongoing demographic change across the United States, utilizing data that take into account the share and relevant characteristics of families with young children can help assure that these efforts equitably and effectively serve all households with young children.

 

 

 

Arizona

Maryland

Oklahoma

California

Michigan

Oregon

Colorado

Minnesota

Pennsylvania

Connecticut

Missouri

South Carolina

Florida North Carolina

Tennessee

Georgia

New Jersey

Texas
Illinois New Mexico

Utah

Indiana

Nevada

Virginia

Kansas

New York

Washington
Massachusetts

Ohio

Wisconsin

 

 

Table of Contents 

I. Income, Poverty, Family Structure, Employment Status, and Health Insurance Coverage

II. English Proficiency, Educational Attainment, and LEP Status

Diversity in Languages Spoken at Home

III. Conclusion