E.g., 08/01/2014
E.g., 08/01/2014

Immigrants and Homeownership in Urban America: An Examination of Nativity, Socio-Economic Status and Place

Reports
April 2004

Immigrants and Homeownership in Urban America: An Examination of Nativity, Socio-Economic Status and Place

This report analyzes the housing status of immigrants in the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the United States with respect to homeownership. In addition, it examines the factors that appear to influence homeownership among immigrants, and the programs and initiatives that can encourage homeownership among these groups.

The report finds that different cities show distinctly different immigrant homeownership patterns. In new immigrant gateway cities, ownership rates for Latinos and Asians are relatively high due to the availability of co-ethnic information sources and financial resources, as well as affordable owner-occupied housing. In contrast, low Latino and Asian ownership rates in new fast-growing immigrant hubs appear to reflect both the recent arrival or many migrants and the scarcity of services that support their homeownership aspirations. Traditional large immigrant gateways are the least promising in terms of homeownership for both natives and immigrants, according to the report. Authors attribute low ownership rates largely to the lack of affordable owner-occupied homes and stiff competition for available housing.

Factors such as household income, education, age, gender, marital status, type of household, the presence or absence of children, and race have an effect on homeownership for both natives and immigrants. However, the report suggests that ownership outcomes among immigrant households are influenced by several additional factors, including country of origin, length of time in the United States, citizenship status, and English-language proficiency. The cultural value of homeownership as a status marker among certain immigrant groups also seems to play a role in the decision to pursue homeownership.