E.g., 07/23/2016
E.g., 07/23/2016

South America

South America

South America has been experiencing significant changes in migration flows within the last decade, with more movement within the region, chiefly for labor reasons, and a decline in emigration beyond the region as a result of improving South American economies and reduced prospects elsewhere. Argentina, Brazil, and Chile have attracted the most significant regional migration, with Brazil the preferred destination for migration from outside the continent. Migration beyond South America is chiefly to the United States and Europe. The articles offered here sketch the dynamism of South America's migration trends and policies.

Recent Activity

Online Journal
Online Journal
Online Journal
Online Journal
Online Journal
Online Journal

Pages

The search yielded 0 results
The search yielded 0 results
The search yielded 0 results
The search yielded 0 results
Online Journal

The Brazilian immigrant population in the United States doubled during the 1980s and almost tripled in the 1990s, but stabilized following the Great Recession. While this population has long included a significant share of unauthorized immigrants, Brazilians are increasingly coming to the United States through family, employment, and study channels. Learn more about Brazilian immigrants with this Spotlight.

Online Journal

News of the Zika virus outbreak in Latin America has raised alarm bells, resulting in scattered calls for tighter restrictions on international entries to the United States. Evidence shows, however, that closing borders and restrictions on international travel tend to have little impact on the spread of infectious diseases. This feature article explores the linkages between public health and migration in the Americas.

Online Journal

Growing rapidly from a population of 90,000 in 1960 to nearly 3 million in 2014, South American immigrants now represent 7 percent of all foreign born in the United States. Family-based immigration is the primary pathway for all South American groups, ranging from 45 percent of Venezuelan immigrants to 97 percent of those from Guyana.

Online Journal

Signed more than 30 years ago, the Cartagena Declaration sought to address rising flows of refugees and establish regional solidarity in refugee protection in Latin America. This article explores the evolution of refugee and asylum policies in Latin America amid the long-running Colombian civil war, as well as the region's response to the current global refugee crisis.

Online Journal

Facing electoral challenges, falling approval rates, and weak economies, some political leaders in 2015 altered border policies or engaged in conflicts across borders as tools of domestic policy. This trend looks at the effects on migration of conflicts between Venezuela and Colombia, Russia and Ukraine, and India and Nepal.

Pages

The search yielded 0 results
The search yielded 0 results
The search yielded 0 results
The search yielded 0 results

Recent Activity

The search yielded 0 results