E.g., 10/25/2014
E.g., 10/25/2014

North America

North America

North America is a dynamic migration region, with the United States home to more immigrants than any other country in the world, the Mexico-U.S. corridor the globe's top migration corridor, and Canada a leading destination for migrants. Research collected here focuses on everything from visa policy and border management to immigrant integration, national identity, the demographics of immigrants in the region and their educational and workforce outcomes, and ways to more effectively use migration policy as a lever for national and regional competitiveness.

Recent Activity

Reports
October 2010
By Demetrios G. Papademetriou, Madeleine Sumption, and Aaron Terrazas
Online Journal
Online Journal
Policy Briefs
September 2010
By Michael Fix and Jennifer Van Hook
Reports
September 2010
By Kathleen Newland, Aaron Terrazas, and Roberto Munster
Reports
September 2010
By Randy Capps and Michael Fix

Pages

Online Journal

MPI's Muzaffar Chishti and Claire Bergeron report on new immigration reform bills, the veto of Arizona's enforcement bill, remittances to Latin America, and more.

Online Journal

Traditional gateways like New York and Los Angeles still attract immigrants. But metro areas including Atlanta, Sacramento, Las Vegas, Minneapolis-St. Paul, and Austin, Texas, have become new destinations for immigrants as Audrey Singer, Susan W. Hardwick, and Caroline B. Brettell explain.

Online Journal

In 2006, more than 11.5 million Mexican immigrants resided in the United States, accounting for 30.7 percent of all US immigrants. MPI's Jeanne Batalova examines the number of Mexican immigrants in the United States, their socioeconomic characteristics, where they live, and the size of the Mexican-born unauthorized population.

Online Journal

MPI's Muzaffar Chishti and Claire Bergeron report on the H-1B visa window, Real ID regulations, Arizona's proposed guest worker program, and more.

Online Journal

There were nearly 34 million temporary admissions to the United States in 2006, twice the number in 1990. MPI's Jeanne Batalova outlines the definition of nonimmigrants and takes a detailed look at admissions data and data limitations.

Pages

Recent Activity

Policy Briefs
September 2005

This policy brief examines and reflects upon lessons learned from the last major attempt to resolve the problem of illegal immigration under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. Arguing that stable reform will require three “E”’s— enforcing immigration laws effectively, expanding visas, and earning legal status —it also offers recommendations for immigration policymaking and management.

Reports
September 2005

This volume of essays looks at the education and immigrant integration efforts in both the United States and Canada.

Reports
September 2005

This report examines how immigration is changing the demographic profile of the United States’ elementary and secondary student population, framing the analysis within the context of the nationwide implementation of No Child Left Behind.

Policy Briefs
August 2005

The 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) was the first legislative attempt to comprehensively address the issue of unauthorized immigration. The bill included sanctions against employers for the hiring of undocumented migrants, more robust border enforcement, and an expansive legalization program that was unprecedented.

Reports
August 2005

This report offers a comprehensive analysis of post-September 11 reforms to the United States’ visa system, examines what these policy changes in policy and procedures entail, and discusses how well they advance the stated goals of the U.S. visa program.

Reports
July 2005

This report looks at what, over time, has determined the various departmental or ministerial locations of migration policy decision-making in different states.

Reports
June 2005

This report evaluates the United States Visitor and immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) program within the broader contexts of national and homeland security as well as immigration law enforcement and policymaking. In doing so, the author provides constructive criticism along with a framework for rethinking US-VISIT’s goal priorities, investment needs, and deadline expectations.

Policy Briefs
June 2005

This policy brief examines the “twilight status” or the de facto partial recognition of two particular categories of immigrants within the United States’ broader undocumented population: those with legally recognized claims to eventual lawful permanent resident status; and those with legally recognized temporary statuses.

Pages