E.g., 08/20/2014
E.g., 08/20/2014

Regional Migration Study Group - Reading Room

Regional Migration Study Group - Reading Room

Immigrants

Country Profiles

Migration Fundamentals

  • Health Outcomes of Mexican Immigrant Women in the United States: According to the National Population Council of Mexico, only 15 percent of Mexican immigrant women in the United States were enrolled in public health programs in 2012. Much of what is known about the Mexican immigrant population's access to health care in the United States is based on combined data for both sexes. However, in terms of health, women have different experiences and needs, and it is therefore important to deepen knowledge of health determinants, access to and use of health services, and health status of this group in particular. This article provides a comparative analysis of health outcomes of Mexican immigrant women in the United States, assessing the results against what is known as the immigrant paradox — the idea that these women enjoy a better state of health overall than might be expected, given their socioeconomic status and very limited health insurance coverage.
  • Beyond Remittances: Reframing Diaspora-Driven Development in El Salvador: El Salvador's lengthy civil war crushed diasporas' opportunities for political or civic engagement in this small, densely-populated Central American nation. However, hometown associations — diaspora organizations that contribute to the development needs of their members' hometowns — represent a modern-day venue for civil society participation. This article explores how diasporas are contributing to development in more ways than just cash flows and projects by transforming the governance landscape.
  • The Under-Registration of Births in Mexico: Consequences for Children, Adults, and Migrants: An estimated 7 percent of people in Mexico were not registered with the government at birth and thus lack official record of their name, age, parentage, and citizenship. A primer on this issue with insight into the experience of these unregistered migrants.
  • On the Other Side of the Fence: Changing Dynamics of Migration in the Americas: Migration from Latin America to the United States and Europe appears to have slowed in the wake of the recent global financial crisis. Flows between Latin American countries expanded in the 1990s and are still growing, crisis or not, and some countries are taking a more regional approach to managing migration.
  • Central America: Crossroads of the Americas: Many migratory streams from Central America — including refugees, economic migrants, and transit flows headed north from South America and elsewhere — have converged in North America since the 1980s. An outline of the region's main trends.
  • Demographic Trends in Mexico: The Implications for Skilled Migration: Mexico is providing a rapidly growing flow of professionals and the skill level of Mexican immigrants is gradually rising.

Resources from the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

The United States and Mexico: Forging a Strategic Partnership
Report of the Study Group on U.S.-Mexico Relations
Author: Co-Chairs: Ambassador Andrés Rozental and Professor Peter H. Smith 
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Los Estados Unidos y México: Construyendo Una Asociación Estratégica
Un reporte del Grupo de la Relación México-Estados Unidos 
Author: Co-Chairs: Ambassador Andrés Rozental and Professor Peter H. Smith 
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Education in the U.S.-Mexico Relationship
Author: Eduardo Andere M. 
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