E.g., 11/28/2015
E.g., 11/28/2015

Migration Information Source

G. Kraftschik

The digital era offers opportunities for cities to improve access and outreach to residents, including immigrants and minority groups, through online tools and apps. This feature article explores ditigal-inclusion strategies in "smart" cities New York, London, and Barcelona, as well as the creative use of new technologies in response to the European refugee crisis.


The Fifth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled to maintain an injunction on President Obama's signature deferred action programs and the timing of the administration's Supreme Court appeal will prove critical amid the 2016 election campaign. This Policy Beat also explores a federal judge's decision not to block a Texas policy refusing to issue birth certificates to the U.S.-born children of unauthorized parents. Should the policy be upheld, it could open the door for further limitations on birthright citizenship.

Lawyers for Human Rights

Systemic corruption has flourished in South Africa's asylum system due to large backlogs and rising demand. Though apartheid's end ushered in a progressive refugee law, inefficiency, administrative justice violations, and corruption have narrowed the humanitarian protection channel. Asylum seekers and refugees often face the stark choice of paying bribes to access services or risking deportation.

Chad Nelson/World Relief

The United States is the largest refugee resettlement country in the world, with 69,933 newly arrived refugees granted protection in 2015. Responding to the global humanitarian crisis, the Obama administration has proposed increasing the number of refugees the United States accepts annually to 100,000 in 2017. This article delves into the most recent refugee and asylum data in the United States, including top countries of origin, states of settlement, and more.

Direct Relief

The emigration of health-care professionals from Malawi led to drastic labor shortages in the impoverished nation in the early 2000s. To combat this brain drain, the government launched an action plan that has largely stabilized the outflow. However, human resource challenges to Malawi's health-care system remain acute and complex, as discussed in this feature article.

LBJ Library/Yoichi Okamoto

Signed into law 50 years ago, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 had several unintended consequences that have had a profound effect on the flow of immigrants to the United States and contributed to the transformation of the U.S. demographic profile. This Policy Beat explores the law's lasting impact and lessons for policymaking today.

Recent Articles

In the 1920s, the Catholic Church in Mexico feared that mass emigration north caused the breakup of families and religious conversions. David Fitzgerald of the University of California, San Diego looks at how Church policy eventually became a voice for migrants' rights and how these policies have affected Mexican migration flows and Mexican government policies.
MPI's Muzaffar Chishti and Claire Bergeron report on a recent Supreme Court decision, hearings on comprehensive immigration reform, new worksite enforcement operation guidelines, and more.
The 4.5 million older immigrants residing in the United States in 2007 accounted for 12 percent of all senior citizens age 65 and older. MPI's Aaron Terrazas examines the socioeconomic characteristics, where they live, their health and disability status, and their sources of income.
Just a fraction of all U.S. employers use E-Verify, a federal system that checks potential employees' immigration status and their eligibility to work. MPI's Marc Rosenblum explores E-Verify's history, how it works, and the arguments for and against making it mandatory.
The middle class has received considerable attention during the current economic crisis. About 15 million people resided in middle-class immigrant households in 2007, and three-quarters of all children in such households were native-born U.S. citizens. MPI's Aaron Terrazas examines where the heads of middle-class immigrant households are from, when they arrived in the United States, their occupations, and other characteristics.


Following a bitterly contested vote in Parliament, Germany's president has signed the nation's first immigration law.
As the U.S.-born children of Latino immigrants reach adulthood, new data suggest that they will fare better than their immigrant peers. Richard Fry, Senior Research Associate at the Pew Hispanic Center, explains why.
Fewer opportunities may await asylum seekers in France, where stricter policies are overlapping with strained resources.

Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC): Authorized under the Social Security Act of 1935, AFDC provided financial assistance to families with children who were deprived of support due to the unemployment, death, disability, or absence of at least one parent. AFDC was replaced by PRWORA in 1996.

U.S. lawmakers are preparing to vote on reauthorizing the 1996 legislation that limited immigrant access to federally funded welfare benefits. Audrey Singer, Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution, maps out what is at stake for all sides in the debate.


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