E.g., 01/29/2015
E.g., 01/29/2015

Migration Information Source

Matt Becker

With the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1943 and normalization of U.S.-China relations in the late 1970s, Chinese immigration to the United States has steadily increased, to a population of more than 2 million. Using the latest data, this Spotlight highlights characteristics of Chinese immigrants from mainland China and Hong Kong, including their top state and metro areas of residence, immigration pathways, educational attainment, and more.

Carmine Flamminio

In Moldova, 100,000 children have been left behind by migrant parents; in Ukraine, there are 200,000 such children. The scale of labor migration and impact of remittances on both economies have prompted Moldova and Ukraine to work with the European Union and international organizations to develop policies addressing the welfare of left-behind children. This article examines research on the effects of parental migration on children and the policy environment.

Matias Garabedian

Normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States will have a significant impact on U.S. immigration policy and future Cuban migration to the United States. This Policy Beat explores the U.S.-Cuba migration relationship, as fear of changes to the "wet-foot, dry-foot" policy has spurred hundreds of new boat arrivals in recent months.

Online Journal
UK Department for International Development

The Migration Information Source’s annual Top 10 examines key migration developments of 2014. The Top 10 touches down around the world: from Africa, where the Ebola outbreak prompted quarantines, travel controls, and bans; to Europe, confronting rising humanitarian flows; to the Middle East, where the migrant worker regulation system is under ever sharper attack; and to Asia, where reform to China's hukou system could benefit more than 100 million internal migrants.

--Mark--/Flickr

Migration to the United States from the Korean peninsula, largely from South Korea, owes its roots to political, military, and economic factors, with an estimated 1.1 million Korean immigrants in the United States. Korean migration to the United States has stalled in recent years, and even declined, with a small but growing number of immigrants and their U.S.-born children returning to Korea, as this article explores.

Eduardo Flores/Agencia Andes

This country profile analyzes Ecuador's migration trends and examines how remittances and return migration have become an important policy focus for a country with an estimated 1.5 million to 2 million nationals living abroad, chiefly in the United States, Spain, and Italy. As waves of emigration occurred, the country also has experienced significant inflows of refugees and economic and lifestyle migrants.

Recent Articles

The Obama administration’s decision to shield from deportation unauthorized immigrant youth who meet certain qualifications represents the boldest immigration policy undertaken by this White House. MPI’s Muzaffar Chishti and Faye Hipsman examine what comes next and explore some of the new policy’s unanswered questions and implementation challenges.

For economic and political reasons, more governments are turning to visas to admit select groups of highly skilled immigrants (especially in high-tech and high-growth fields) to their countries to boost entrepreneurship and enhance job creation. A look at the challenges, opportunities, and increasing popularity of these entrepreneur visa programs.

Unaccustomed to a large number of migrants, Chile has seen an increase in migrants in the past three decades. Cristián Doña-Reveco and Amanda Levinson examine how the country, still wedded to its dictator-era migration framework, is balancing shifting migration patterns with a piecemeal approach to migration policy.

The nearly 5 million immigrants age 65 and older residing in the United States in 2010 accounted for 12 percent of all elderly as well as 12 percent of the total immigrant population. MPI's Jeanne Batalova examines the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the elderly immigrant population, including where they live, countries of origin, and their sources of income.

MPI’s Muzaffar Chishti, Faye Hipsman, and Claire Bergeron examine the potential outcomes to the Supreme Court’s decision on a key provision to Arizona’s SB 1070 law.

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Cities, especially a few large ones, are the places disproportionately impacted by immigration. Marie Price and Lisa Benton-Short of George Washington University, who have examined the data for 150 cities worldwide, share their findings.

Peter Sutherland, Mark Krikorian, Frank Sharry, and Howard Duncan tell us what surprised them most this year.

The Effect of U.S. Elections on Immigration Reform

L'Europe du Sud connaît trop bien la migration irrégulière à partir des pays de l'Afrique du Nord comme le Maroc, l'Algérie et la Tunisie. Depuis le début des années 1990, de milliers de nord-africains ont tenté de traverser la Méditerranée afin d'atteindre l'Espagne et l'Italie.

Sub-Saharan Africans are increasingly migrating to North African countries, with some using the region as a point of transit to Europe and some remaining in North Africa. Hein de Haas of the University of Oxford examines the the region’s migration trends.

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Using Census 2000 data, MPI Data Manager Elizabeth Grieco examines the ability to speak English among the foreign born at the national, regional, and state levels.

This Spotlight by Elizabeth Grieco, MPI Data Manager, examines some of the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the foreign-born population in the United States.

Globalization has made the international mobility of high-skilled workers a vital issue for the United States. MPI's Maia Jachimowicz and Policy Analyst Deborah W. Meyers explain the complicated visa system for high-skilled temporary workers.

Although the foreign born remain concentrated in certain states, many immigrants are moving into "non-traditional" areas. Elizabeth Grieco, MPI Data Manager, has prepared a spotlight on their settlement patterns.

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996 dramatically reformed the nation's welfare system. MPI's Amanda Levinson takes a closer look at how these changes affected immigrants.

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Machine-Readable Passport Requirement Delayed One Year...
California Allows Undocumented Immigrants to Obtain Driver's License...
US-VISIT Confronts Criticism, Potential Setbacks...
Annual Cap for H-1B Visa Holders Slashed...
New Citizenship Office Chief Appointed...
TPS Extended for Burundians and Sudanese, Terminated for Sierra Leonians...

Visa Waiver Transit Programs Suspended...
State Dept. Adds Visa Categories for Border Students...
Ridge Names Citizenship and Immigration Ombudsman...
State Dept. Requires Online Applications for Visa Lottery...
Temporary Protected Status Extended for Liberians...

State Dept. Tightens Rules on Visa Applicant Interviews...
Agreements With Chile, Singapore Open Door to Trade in Services...
DHS Fully Implements Foreign Student Tracking System...
TPS Extended for Montserratians, Salvadorans, Somalians...
DHS Expands Efforts to Deport ‘Predatory’ Criminal Aliens...

Justice Dept. Report Cites Abuse of Detainees After Sept. 11...
Court Approves Ongoing Secrecy on Post-Sept. 11 Detainees' Names...
Hispanics Become Largest Minority in the United States...
Post-Sept. 11 Economic Woes Squeeze H-1B Visa Program...

New Tracking System Will Photograph, Fingerprint Visa Holders...
Somali Bantu Refugees Resettled to the U.S....
Deadline Nears for LIFE Act Permanent Residency Applications...
Temporary Protected Status Extended for Hondurans, Nicaraguans...
ICE Slated for Reorganization...

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