E.g., 03/05/2015
E.g., 03/05/2015

Migration Information Source

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Faced with rising numbers of foreign entries (long- and short-term), China in 2012 adopted new legislation to manage its migration flows—the first reform to the country's immigration law since 1985. With an underlying tension in the legal framework between restricting immigrants deemed unwanted and welcoming those viewed as desirable, this feature examines the exit-entry law's key points.

Ludovic Bertron

An estimated 41.3 million immigrants lived in the United States in 2013, about 13 percent of the total U.S. population, constituting the world's largest foreign-born population. This Spotlight from MPI's Jie Zong and Jeanne Batalova offers the most current and sought-after data on immigrants in the United States—including origin, educational attainment, the unauthorized, deportations, and more—in one easy-to-use resource.

Ching Kwan Lee

Migration has begun to follow the flow of capital after years of Chinese investment in major infrastructure projects in Zambia. This feature article, based on original research including the coding of 25,000 Zambian entry permits, examines the emerging migration pattern from China to Zambia, as Chinese migration to the country has increased 60 percent since 2009.

Zach Pippin

President Obama's sweeping executive action to shield as many as 3.7 million unauthorized immigrants who are parents of U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents from deportation is facing tough legal and political challenges. This month's Policy Beat examines the efforts to proceed with implementation of DAPA and the expansion of DACA despite a lawsuit brought by a coalition of 26 states and staunch opposition in the Republican-controlled Congress.

Yoichi Okamoto/LBJ Library

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, radically altering U.S. policy and reshaping the demographic profile of the United States. Examining the foreign policy and domestic concerns leading to the law's enactment, David S. FitzGerald and David Cook-Martín argue that the demise of the national-origins quota system was driven by geopolitical factors.

Matt Becker

With the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1943 and normalization of U.S.-China relations in the late 1970s, Chinese immigration to the United States has steadily increased, to a population of more than 2 million. Using the latest data, this Spotlight highlights characteristics of Chinese immigrants from mainland China and Hong Kong, including their top state and metro areas of residence, immigration pathways, educational attainment, and more.

Recent Articles

In recent years, many governments have tightened their citizenship requirements as a way to promote better immigrant integration. In examining citizenship policy in the United States, Canada, and countries in the European Union, this article considers the balance policymakers face between requirements that may be too difficult for immigrants to meet and ones that will better help them find success in their new countries of residence.

In the past 50 years, the number and share of European immigrants in the United States have declined significantly. A look at the population's size, geographic distribution, admission categories, and demographic and socioeconomic characteristics.

Though little recognized as such, the Workforce Investment Act represents one of the most important immigrant integration initiatives in the United States, assisting workers in obtaining the necessary training and language skills to advance in the workforce. Despite a steady increase of immigrants in need of these services, a decreasing share are able to access the programs to keep pace with a changing labor market.

For two decades, Australia has experimented with different asylum policies in response to an increase in refugees and asylum seekers entering the country. A look at the country's challenges in managing a hotly contested political and public debate.

There were 1.8 million immigrant health care workers employed in the United States in 2010, accounting for 16 percent of all civilians working in health care occupations. MPI's Kristen McCabe examines the demographic and labor characteristics of this population, including countries of origin, occupations, gender, and educational and linguistic proficiency.

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A number of governments and institutions are determined to ride international migration toward a future of greater prosperity. MPI's Kathleen Newland outlines what they all should know about the pluses and minuses of the most basic issues that frame the debate on migration and development: remittances and the brain drain.

Nebraska's foreign-born population grew faster than that of any other Midwestern state between 1990 and 2000. Lourdes Gouveia and Mary Ann Powell of the University of Nebraska at Omaha shed light on the second generation's progress in the country's heartland.

The addition of Romania and Bulgaria to the European Union means another round of anxieties about labor migrants. Catherine Drew and Dhananjayan Sriskandarajah of the Institute for Public Policy Research in London explain how this enlargement is different from the historic one in 2004 and why most EU Member States favor temporary restriction.

Cities, especially a few large ones, are the places disproportionately impacted by immigration. Marie Price and Lisa Benton-Short of George Washington University, who have examined the data for 150 cities worldwide, share their findings.

Peter Sutherland, Mark Krikorian, Frank Sharry, and Howard Duncan tell us what surprised them most this year.

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Data Manager Elizabeth Grieco examines the size and distribution of the foreign-born Hispanic population throughout the United States.

Using Census 2000 data, MPI Data Manager Elizabeth Grieco examines the ability to speak English among the foreign born at the national, regional, and state levels.

This Spotlight by Elizabeth Grieco, MPI Data Manager, examines some of the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the foreign-born population in the United States.

Globalization has made the international mobility of high-skilled workers a vital issue for the United States. MPI's Maia Jachimowicz and Policy Analyst Deborah W. Meyers explain the complicated visa system for high-skilled temporary workers.

Although the foreign born remain concentrated in certain states, many immigrants are moving into "non-traditional" areas. Elizabeth Grieco, MPI Data Manager, has prepared a spotlight on their settlement patterns.

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Homeland Security Dept. Takes Charge of Visa Policy...
Homeland Security Appropriations Exceed Bush Proposal...
Training Begins for 'One Face At The Border'...
Food Stamps Restored to Immigrant Children...

Machine-Readable Passport Requirement Delayed One Year...
California Allows Undocumented Immigrants to Obtain Driver's License...
US-VISIT Confronts Criticism, Potential Setbacks...
Annual Cap for H-1B Visa Holders Slashed...
New Citizenship Office Chief Appointed...
TPS Extended for Burundians and Sudanese, Terminated for Sierra Leonians...

Visa Waiver Transit Programs Suspended...
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Ridge Names Citizenship and Immigration Ombudsman...
State Dept. Requires Online Applications for Visa Lottery...
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State Dept. Tightens Rules on Visa Applicant Interviews...
Agreements With Chile, Singapore Open Door to Trade in Services...
DHS Fully Implements Foreign Student Tracking System...
TPS Extended for Montserratians, Salvadorans, Somalians...
DHS Expands Efforts to Deport ‘Predatory’ Criminal Aliens...

Justice Dept. Report Cites Abuse of Detainees After Sept. 11...
Court Approves Ongoing Secrecy on Post-Sept. 11 Detainees' Names...
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Post-Sept. 11 Economic Woes Squeeze H-1B Visa Program...

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