E.g., 12/22/2014
E.g., 12/22/2014

Migration Information Source

Online Journal
UK Department for International Development

The Migration Information Source’s annual Top 10 examines key migration developments of 2014. The Top 10 touches down around the world: from Africa, where the Ebola outbreak prompted quarantines, travel controls, and bans; to Europe, confronting rising humanitarian flows; to the Middle East, where the migrant worker regulation system is under ever sharper attack; and to Asia, where reform to China's hukou system could benefit more than 100 million internal migrants.

--Mark--/Flickr

Migration to the United States from the Korean peninsula, largely from South Korea, owes its roots to political, military, and economic factors, with an estimated 1.1 million Korean immigrants in the United States. Korean migration to the United States has stalled in recent years, and even declined, with a small but growing number of immigrants and their U.S.-born children returning to Korea, as this article explores.

Eduardo Flores/Agencia Andes

This country profile analyzes Ecuador's migration trends and examines how remittances and return migration have become an important policy focus for a country with an estimated 1.5 million to 2 million nationals living abroad, chiefly in the United States, Spain, and Italy. As waves of emigration occurred, the country also has experienced significant inflows of refugees and economic and lifestyle migrants.

Stephen Melkisethian

While immigration and the Latino vote may not have been decisive in the 2014 midterm elections, the Republican takeover of the Senate come January 2015 and increased majority in the House have significant implications for the outcome of the immigration debate. This article examines the changing dynamics and the president's intent to proceed with executive action to shield some of the unauthorized immigrant population from deportation.

U.Funollet/UNESCO

Pacific Islanders with criminal convictions have found themselves deported from Australia, New Zealand, or the United States, which have shifted their immigration enforcement priorities in recent years. This article explores the significant barriers to reintegration that criminal deportees in Pacific Island countries face upon their return, including difficulty accessing community networks and jobs.

Jeffrey/Flickr

From 1980 to 2013, the sub-Saharan African immigrant population in the United States increased from 130,000 to 1.5 million, roughly doubling each decade between 1980 and 2010. This profile provides up-to-date demographic information for sub-Saharan immigrants including location, educational attainment, workforce participation, and much more.

Recent Articles

This article dissects the current patchwork of overlapping and potentially conflicting authorities for immigration enforcement and policymaking in the United States, based on unique, country-wide surveys and city case studies.

Immigration and international development policy conversations have become entangled in the U.S. context, not necessarily to the benefit of either debate. This article explores how a contemporary understanding and decoupling of the issues can contribute to more effective policymaking.

In 2011, the United States granted humanitarian protection to nearly 81,000 immigrants, including some 56,000 refugees and 25,000 asylum seekers. This article takes a detailed look at the most recent refugee and asylum data in the United States – finding that asylum grants in 2011 reversed a downward trend observed since 2007.

MPI's Claire Bergeron and Faye Hipsman report on Democratic and Republican party platforms and their takes on immigration, new rules rendering DACA beneficiaries ineligible for Medicaid and CHIP, CBP's elimination of paper I-94 cards, and more.

Tax liability for income earned overseas by Americans has been part of the U.S. tax system since the federal income tax was first introduced in 1861. Since 2009, the United States has witnessed a rise in citizenship renunciation, especially among the affluent. Some see this as a barometer of the waning appeal of U.S. citizenship, which has been and remains an aspirational goal for many around the world. However, it seems as though legislative and regulatory factors may be the more likely triggers for this new trend.

Pages

In the United States, the academic success of children of Chinese and Korean immigrants usually is attributed to either their culture or the U.S. immigration system, which favors skilled migrants. Min Zhou and Susan S. Kim of the University of California, Los Angeles compare the after-school institutions in these communities to explain the effect of ethnicity on educational outcomes.

Relatively little is known about migration that involves more than one destination. Ayumi Takenaka of Bryn Mawr College examines the available data to assess who re-migrates to the United States.

Since 2003, the Netherlands has instituted a variety of integration-related reforms to make sure new immigrants speak Dutch and understand Dutch society. But the political climate changed in 2006, and the new government is taking a broader approach as Chavi Keeney Nana explains.

Approximately 50,000 of Germany's 170,000 tolerated asylum seekers are expected to will qualify for a residency permit under a law passed in March 2007. MPI's Eric Leise reports.

There is an ongoing debate over the children born to Europe's guest workers of the 1960s and 1970s: Can they move up the educational ladder, or will they form a new underclass in Europe's largest cities? Maurice Crul of the University of Amsterdam compares outcomes for second-generation Turkish children across five countries.

Pages

MPI’s Elizabeth Grieco and Brian Ray outline the characteristics of Mexican immigrants in the U.S. workforce.

MPI Data Manager Elizabeth Grieco provides an overview of the
fifth-largest immigrant group in the United States.

MPI Data Manager Elizabeth Grieco provides an overview of the fourth-largest immigrant group in the United States.

MPI Data Manager Elizabeth Grieco provides an overview of the third-largest immigrant group in the United States.

MPI Data Manager Elizabeth Grieco provides an overview of the second-largest immigrant group in the United States.

Pages

The search yielded 0 results

Pages

MPI's Jennifer Yau and Betsy Cooper report on intelligence reform, the safe third country agreement between the U.S. and Canada, and changes to the H-1B and L-1 visa programs.

MPI's Jennifer Yau reports on Arizona's Proposition 200, U.S.-Mexico migration talks, and continued debate on the Homeland Security Bill.

Policy BeatCongressional Leaders Consider Homeland Security Bill...
H-1B Visa Cap for 2005 Reached on First Day of Fiscal Year...
USCIS Releases New Immigrant Orientation Guide...
Policy Beat In Brief...

Security Clearances Cause DHS to Slow Application Processing...
9/11 Commission Releases Report on Terrorist Travel...
Government Reports Encourage Additional DHS Visa Reform...

DHS Expands Expedited Removal Effort...
Biometric Passports Delayed, Biometric Exit Program to Expand...
DHS Extends Stays for Mexican Border Cardholders...
USCIS Changes Work Permit Rules...
Montserratians Lose Temporary Protected Status...

Pages