Native-Born Population, by Age and Sex, for the United States: 2000

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Native-Born Population, by Age and Sex, for the United States: 2000

Notes: 

The shape of the age-sex pyramid of the native population is very similar to that of the total population. Removing the foreign born from the total population has little effect on the overall shape of the age-sex pyramid because of the relatively small size of the foreign born population (which was 11 percent of the total population in 2000). The most striking feature of the native age-sex pyramid is the “baby boom,” the increase in the number of people born after World War II between 1946 and 1964. In 2000, the baby boomers were between age 35 and 54, as can be seen by the relatively large size of those age groups in the age-sex pyramid. The years 1965 to about 1977 are often referred to as the “baby bust” because of the smaller number of children born then. The “baby bust” generation was between the ages of 23 and 35 in 2000, as can be seen by the constriction of those age groups in the age-sex pyramid. The “echo boom” or “boomlet” occurred between 1977 and about 1988, when many of the baby boomers had children who, in 2000, were between 12 and 23. Fertility in the United States declined after 1995, as indicated by the constriction of the pyramid’s base and the relatively smaller number of people under the age of five. In the older age groups, there are far fewer males than females. In most populations, women live longer than men. The dearth of males age 70 and older also reflects deaths during World War II.

Source: 

Migration Policy Institute tabulations of the U.S. Census Bureau's 2000 Census data.