E.g., 07/30/2015
E.g., 07/30/2015

Country Resource - China

China

CN
  • Population...................................................................1,355,692,576 (July 2014 est.)
  • Population growth rate .............................................................0.44% (2014 est.)
  • Birth rate.....................................................12.17 births/1,000 population (2014 est.)
  • Death rate................................................7.44 deaths/1,000 population (2014 est.)
  • Net migration rate...............................-0.32 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2014 est.)
  • Ethnic groups*.......Han Chinese 91.6%, Zhuang 1.3%, other (includes Hui, Manchu, Uighur, Miao, Yi, Tujia, Tibetan, Mongol, Dong, Buyei, Yao, Bai, Korean, Hani, Li, Kazakh, Dai and other nationalities) 7.1%

* the Chinese government officially recognizes 56 ethnic groups (2010 est.)

CIA World Factbook

Ronald Skeldon of the University of Sussex maps out the past and present migration patterns of China — the source of tens of millions of migrants around the globe — and discusses the country's budding status as an immigrant-receiving nation.

Recent Activity

Tibetans have integrated into Asian and Western societies since 1959 with different types of outcomes. In Part II of our two-part series, Seonaigh MacPherson, Anne-Sophie Bentz, and Dawa Bhuti Ghoso examine integration experiences, the diaspora's political success, the gaps between those in Tibet and Tibetans abroad, and what lies ahead for the Tibetan diaspora.

Approximately 122,000 Tibetans, including those of Tibetan ancestry, live outside their homeland. Seonaigh MacPherson, Anne-Sophie Bentz, and Dawa Bhuti Ghoso provide an in-depth look at Tibetan history and Tibetans' migration to India and the West in this first of our two-part series on the Tibetan diaspora.

Along with increased trade and Chinese investment in Africa has come new migration between the two regions. Malia Politzer places this movement in context and looks at the types of Chinese migrants going to Africa and the Africans going to China.

Tsuneo Akaha of the Monterey Institute of International Studies looks at emerging migration patterns in North Korea, China, Russia, and Japan.

Ronald Skeldon of the University of Sussex maps out the migration patterns and policies of China, the source of tens of millions of migrants around the globe.

Frank Laczko of the IOM examines how increasing numbers of Chinese immigrants are entering Europe.

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