E.g., 07/06/2015
E.g., 07/06/2015

Rebecca Kilberg

MPI Authors

Rebecca Kilberg

Rebecca Kilberg was a Communications Specialist at the Migration Policy Institute, where she worked on publication design and production, dissemination of the Institute’s research, website operations, and monitoring of the Institute's media mentions. She also was a contributing author to the Migration Information Source, MPI’s online journal.

Previously Ms. Kilberg worked as a research fellow at a political consulting firm in Washington, DC.

Ms. Kilberg graduated with honors from the University of Chicago with a bachelor's degree in linguistics and a minor in Germanic studies.

 

Bio Page Tabs

Fears regarding the spread of the deadly Ebola virus following an outbreak in Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone prompted governments around the world to regulate travel from and within West Africa. Travel bans, airport health screenings, closed borders, and traveler quarantines were among the policies implemented. International organizations argue such restrictions drive possibly symptomatic travelers to illegally bypass borders and encourage dishonesty in the exit screening process.

Ankara

Turkey’s migration identity has shifted from being principally a country of emigration and transit to becoming a destination for immigrants and people fleeing conflict. In response, Turkish policymakers recently enacted a comprehensive migration and asylum law that took effect in April 2014. This article examines the new law, which is intended as a significant step toward managing both legal and irregular migration to Turkey, including humanitarian migration.

Immigrant legalizations in the United States and Europe ("regularizations" in the EU context) have been used repeatedly for broad and discrete groups of immigrants. A look at how these programs have been implemented historically and the political and policy implications they face today.